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The Salt Lake County Library, in conjunction with the HistoryMakers organization, will honor Emma E. Houston, Judge Shauna Graves-Robertson and Joyce M. Gray in a special program on Saturday, Feb. 3, at the library’s Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West.

WEST JORDAN — The Salt Lake County Library, in conjunction with the HistoryMakers organization, will honor Emma E. Houston, Judge Shauna Graves-Robertson and Joyce M. Gray in a special program on Saturday, Feb. 3, at the library’s Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West.

The program will spotlight the three’s contributions to the community and feature a question-and-answer session. Space is limited. Interested parties should RSVP at slcolibrary.org/specialevents.

According to the HistoryMakers’ website, Houston, the assistant program manager of the county’s Aging Services, has performed civic work in Salt Lake City for almost 20 years. She was hired by the Girl Scouts of Utah in 1989 and served as the director of membership until 1993, when she became the diversity coordinator at Rowland Hall St. Mark’s School.

Graves-Robertson, who received a bachelor’s in criminal justice in 1980 at Arizona State University, was appointed by Gov. Scott Matheson to head the State Office of Black Affairs in 1984. While serving in that capacity, she worked with community leaders and organizations to promote economic development throughout minority communities. She then earned her master’s in public administration and a Juris Doctor from the University of Utah. In 1999, Graves-Robertson was appointed to the Salt Lake County Justice Court, where she is the presiding judge.

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Gray, who received a bachelor’s in music at Virginia State University and a master’s in education from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas moved to Salt Lake City in 1981 where she taught instrumental music at West Lake Junior High School. The following year, Gray was appointed to serve as the district’s multicultural programs coordinator. In 1984, she became principal at Arcadia Elementary School, the first African-American principal in the state. She then served as principal at Granite’s Roosevelt Elementary before becoming principal at Bryant Middle School and then West High School. She then earned her doctorate in education from the U. in 2001 and went on to become director for Career and Technical Education in school district. She retired in 2005.

Since 1999, the HistoryMakers organization has been recording African-American oral histories to refashion a more inclusive record of American history.