Screenshot, NYTimes.com
The New York Times used AccuWeather’s database of more than 3,800 cities around the world to unveil how warmer cities were in 2017 compared to 2016.

If you think Salt Lake City was warmer this year than last year, you’re right.

The New York Times used AccuWeather’s database of more than 3,800 cities around the world to unveil how much warmer cities were in 2017 compared to 2016.

According to the Times data, 88 percent of the 3,800 cities recorded annual mean temperatures that were higher than normal.

Salt Lake City saw a 3.3-degree increase in heat from 2016 to 2017. The average temperature in the Beehive State capital city for the year was 56.1 degrees.

The New York Times classified Salt Lake City’s temperature jump as “normal.”

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released data earlier this year that said the average temperature for the lower 48 states was about 54.6 degrees Fahrenheit, which was 2.6 degrees higher than average temperatures in the 20th century, according to The Los Angeles Times.

“This is the new normal,” Gavin A. Schmidt, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, told The New York Times in a separate article. “It’s also changing. It’s not that we’ve gotten to a new plateau — this isn’t where we’ll stay. In 10 years we’re going to say ‘oh look, another record decade of warming temperatures.’”

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Other Utah cities on The New York Times list showed jumps as well. Provo increased 1.9 degrees to an average 54 degrees, Ogden jumped 1.4 degrees to 52.7 degrees on average for the year and Moab climbed 3.4 degrees for a 56.7 degree average temperature.

You can research other city temperatures at The New York Times.

Salt Lake City saw a number of its temperature records broken through 2017. On July 5, Salt Lake City International Airport saw temperatures reach 105 degrees Fahrenheit, which broke the record set in 1973, according to the Deseret News.

Salt Lake City broke records on Nov. 22, too, reaching a high of 68 degrees, which shattered a 1926 record, the Deseret News reported.