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Spenser Heaps, Deseret News
The Right Rev. Scott B. Hayashi, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Utah, shared a post on Facebook on Thursday regarding the importance of shared efforts with other religions. Rev. Hayashi cited the LDS Church and its humanitarian efforts as an example.

SALT LAKE CITY — Saying Americans “are hungry” for disagreeing people who continue to maintain positive relationships, the Episcopal Diocese of Utah is citing recent humanitarian donations from the LDS Church and the latter’s hosting of Episcopal Migration Ministries officials as evidences of successful efforts shared by differing faiths.

“I believe that it is very important to demonstrate that people can work together, value each other, and have friendships with each other, even though there are points of profound differences between us,” wrote the Rt. Reve. Scott B. Hayashi on the Episcopal Diocese of Utah’s Facebook page in a Thursday evening post. “I believe that the people of this nation are hungry to see people disagree and still be in positive relationship.”

Saying it is easy for one to believe the worst about others, even if it is not true, Bishop Hayashi noted he has repeatedly heard that Mormons only help other Mormons and added: “This is far from the truth.”

Spenser Heaps, Deseret News
The Right Rev. Scott B. Hayashi, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Utah, shared a post on Facebook on Thursday regarding the importance of shared efforts with other religions. Rev. Hayashi cited the LDS Church and its humanitarian efforts as an example.

Bishop Hayashi pointed to last month’s $250,000 donation from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to the Episcopal Migration Ministries — the second such cash and in-kind donation in as many years — as well as a visit from EMM officials to the LDS Church’s Salt Lake City headquarters as examples as well as Mormon volunteers assisting locally in community feeding programs sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Utah.

“This is a huge donation and will go to help sustain the work of the EEM as they live the call of welcome by supporting refugees, immigrants and the communities that embrace them as they walk together in The Episcopal Church’s movement to create loving, liberating and life-giving relationships rooted in compassion,” he wrote. “EMM’s desire to honor the inherent value of connection brings communities together to love their neighbors as themselves.”

Last month’s donation to Episcopal Migration Ministries was part of a $5 million total of cash and in-kind donations from the LDS Church’s Humanitarian Fund to nine different voluntary refugee resettlement agencies in the United States.

The Episcopal Migration Ministries, based in New York City and with affiliate offices in 17 states, released the following statement on the heels of last month’s donations:

“The support from the LDS Church has allowed Episcopal Migration Ministries to grant support projects for housing and health issues focused on homelessness prevention and intensive services for refugee cases with medical needs. We are thankful for LDS Church leadership in support of refugee resettlement.”

The full text of the Bishop Hayashi’s post of the Episcopal Diocese of Utah’s Facebook page reads:

“As the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Utah and personally, I have believed that establishing good relationships with the other religious traditions here in Utah is an important witness to make. This has been enjoyable work for me and I am gratified to have these relationships. I believe that it is very important to demonstrate that people can work together, value each other, and have friendships with each other even though there are points of profound differences between us. I believe that the people of this nation are hungry to see people disagree and still be in positive relationship.

“It is so easy to believe the worst about others even if it is not true. One of the things I have heard many times is that Mormons only help other Mormons. This is far from the truth. In the Diocese of Utah, the LDS Church has provided many tons of food to be distributed at Episcopal food banks. They have also provided volunteers to help in community feeding programs that take place at Episcopal Congregations.

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“Recently, some people from Episcopal Migration Ministries visited Salt Lake City. I was out of country when this took place so I cannot report on all that was discussed or where they toured. What I can tell you is that the LDS Church determined that the work of the Episcopal Migration Ministries is very important. In demonstration of this, they made a donation of support to the EMM in the amount of 250,000 dollars. This is a huge donation and will go to help sustain the work of the EMM as they live the call of welcome by supporting refugees, immigrants and the communities that embrace them as they walk together in The Episcopal Church’s movement to create loving, liberating and life-giving relationships rooted in compassion. EMM’s desire to honor the inherent value of human connection brings communities together to love their neighbors as themselves.

“Go here for more information about Episcopal Migration Ministries [htts://episcopalmigrationministries.org].

“I am thankful to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for this and am grateful for the way we are working together to bring relief to many people who need help.”