Screenshot
Iguanas will star to slow down once temperatures drop below 50 degrees. Bigger iguanas will experience a shutdown when temperatures are even colder temperatures.

Fallen iguanas are appearing all over the place in parts of Florida.

Don’t worry. They’re not dead. Just frozen from the cold temperatures blasting across the East Coast this week.

Several people took to Twitter to share videos and photos of the fallen iguanas.

CBS reporter Maxine Bentzel said the iguanas will thaw if they’re moved into the sun.

According to BuzzFeed News, iguanas slow down once temperatures drop below 50 degrees. Bigger iguanas will experience a shutdown when temperatures are even colder.

Most iguanas sleep in trees, which is why they’ve been falling from the sky.

Kristen Sommers, who leads the fish and wildlife program for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, told the Associated Press that the freezing temperatures barreling through the East Coast have made iguanas more sluggish.

“It’s too cold for them to move,” she said.

Sommers said people should leave the iguanas alone since they might try to bite you once the temperatures warm up.

Emily Maple, the reptile keeper at the Palm Beach County Zoo, told WPEC CBS 12 that this “cold stunned” effect will only last for another day or two.

1 comment on this story

"If it's just for a day or two, they'll just get to where they're completely frozen in time. They're still able to breathe. They're still able to do bodily functions just very slow," Maple said.

Sommers said the commission has opened workshops to teach people how to catch, train and manage iguanas.

“This provides an opportunity to capture some, but I’m not sure it’s going to be cold enough for long enough to make enough of a difference,” she said. “In most cases, they’re going to warm back up and move around again, unless they’re euthanized.”

The fish and wildlife agency said that sea turtles and manatees may also experience shock from the cold temperatures.

Helping sea turtles and manatees weather the coldOur staff, permitted volunteers and partners are working diligently to...

Posted by MyFWC on Wednesday, January 3, 2018