President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, before heading to Utah. Trump will be announcing plans to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, responding to what he has condemned as a "massive federal land grab" by the government. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Susan Walsh, AP

SALT LAKE CITY — Do Americans like President Donald Trump? The answer varies considerably depending on which Americans one asks.

Trump continues to fare relatively well among white Americans and religious believers, according to a new survey from Public Religion Research Institute. But he's much less beloved by black Americans, women and "Never Trump Republicans," who represent about 1 in 5 members of the president's party.

Overall, the eighth annual American Values Survey released Tuesday presents a snapshot of a polarizing presidency, as well as insights related to NFL prayer protests, sexual assault and health care policy. It's based on responses from a random sample of 2,019 U.S. adults, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points. Phone interviews took place from Oct. 18-30, 2017.

Here are four key graphics related to Trump's public image:

1. Trump job performance

More than half of U.S. adults (54 percent) disapprove of the president's job performance, while 41 percent say they approve.

Aaron Thorup, Public Religion Research Institute
Public Religion Research Institute

Similar shares of black Americans (87 percent) and Democrats (85 percent) frown upon Trump's work. He's also unpopular among women and Hispanic Americans, with more than 6 in 10 members of each group saying that they disapprove.

Researchers explored the flexibility of people's performance ratings, showing that the president's future actions may not alter survey results.

"Among those who approve of Trump's job performance, nearly 4 in 10 (37 percent) say there is almost nothing the president could do to lose their approval," the survey reported. "Among those who disapprove … approximately 6 in 10 (61 percent) say there is almost nothing the president could do to win their approval."

2. Some Republicans hope their party ditches Trump

Rather than obsess over all Americans with negative views of his presidency, Trump may want to focus on the Republicans set against his re-election, researchers noted.

The survey showed that nearly 1 in 3 Republicans (31 percent) would prefer another Republican candidate to run in the 2020 presidential election.

Mary Archbold
Trump and the Republican Party

Overall, Public Religion Research Institute classified 18 percent of self-identified GOP members as "Never Trump Republicans," explaining that these Republicans did not vote for him in the 2016 GOP primary and do not want him to run in 2020.

"More than 1 in 10 (11 percent) of Republicans in the Never Trump category are Mormon," the survey reported.

3. Religious Americans don't agree on Trump

Religious responses to Trump continue to be mixed, with Protestants and Catholics supporting the president's job performance at higher rates than non-Christian believers.

Aaron Thorup, Public Religion Research Institute
Public Religion Research Institute

More than 7 in 10 white evangelicals (72 percent) and half of white mainline Protestants (49 percent) and white Catholics (49 percent) say they approve of the president's job performance. "By contrast, fewer than 1 in 3 religious but non-Christian Americans (31 percent)," Hispanic Catholics (21 percent) and black Protestants (9 percent) approve, according to the survey.

Trump remains unpopular among religious unaffiliated adults, with only 3 in 10 religious "nones" expressing approval of his performance.

4. White evangelicals stand by their man

White evangelicals stand out because of their strong support for the president. Nearly one-third of members of this group not only approve of his job performance, but also say there's nothing he could do to lose their trust, Public Religion Research Institute reported.

Public Religion Research Institute

Only 24 percent of white evangelical Protestants can be classified as Trump opponents, the survey showed.