Ravell Call, Deseret News
Rebar is moved to be used in laying foundations in Salt Lake City on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017, during construction of the 9th East Lofts at Bennion Plaza. The building will provide 68 affordable apartments. Salt Lake City’s Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development is seeking public feedback on a recently produced report on inclusionary zoning, which requires or encourages developers to include affordable units in new residential developments.

SALT LAKE CITY — The city’s Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development is seeking public feedback on a recently produced report on inclusionary zoning, which requires or encourages developers to include affordable units in new residential developments.

The department produced the report as part of the city’s ongoing work to address the affordable housing crisis. In February, Mayor Jackie Biskupski released a draft of "Growing SLC: A Five-Year Housing Plan," which is the city’s first comprehensive housing plan since 2000.

During public outreach for the plan, staff heard strong feedback from advocates of affordable housing that inclusionary zoning was an important topic for discussion.

The report reviewed seven inclusionary zoning programs around the country and investigated how Salt Lake City might implement such a program. The report was also guided by the city’s Affordable Housing Finance Working Group, which recommended exploring options that would require 5 percent to 10 percent of new construction projects over 50 units be affordable.

6 comments on this story

A potential first step identified in the report would be to formalize the city’s practice of requiring affordability on housing developments constructed on land purchased from the city. Other options include a citywide, mandatory program requiring affordability in projects of a certain scale; a voluntary program with developer incentives or subsidies; or a mandatory program targeted to a specific geographic region.

“We need to be willing to explore all options to address the housing crisis for the long term in Salt Lake City,” Biskupski said in a statement. “Our greatest concern today, must be for those individuals and families with no, to very low income, a group that includes people working in industries like hospitality and retail, to those moving out of homelessness.”

Members of the public can view the report, and provide feedback by visiting slcgov.com/hand/iz-report.