Susan Walsh, Associated Press
FILE - President Donald Trump, left, sitting next to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, right, speaks during a meeting of the committee and members of the President's economic team in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Hatch has asked Trump to tone down his tweets a number of times. At the same time, he understands why the president uses social media the way he does.

SALT LAKE CITY — If nothing else, President Donald Trump has established himself as the tweeter-in-chief.

Huge doesn’t begin to describe the 63 million followers he has on @RealDonald Trump and @POTUS. But what do members of Utah’s congressional delegation make of the president’s Twitter mouth?

Sen. Orrin Hatch has asked Trump to tone down his tweets a number of times. At the same time, he understands why the president uses social media the way he does.

With his massive following, Trump can “circumvent the media and change the entire national conversation with a simple 280-character tweet,” said Hatch spokesman Matt Whitlock.

Twitter might rue the day it doubled the character count.

Newly elected Congressman John Curtis called Trump's tweets an "unwelcome distraction to our goal of getting meaningful things done for our constituents in Utah."

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders recently defended Trump's often contentious tweeting, saying it's a benefit for the president to speak directly to Americans "without any filter, without any bias."

"I think it's one of the reasons that the president is president … because he often goes directly to the American people, speaks directly to them, and I think that's a plus," she said.

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In what might be the understatement of the year, Rep. Chris Stewart says Trump communicates differently than past presidents.

“While I don’t believe that all of his tweets are intended to be his administration’s policy, I do appreciate his transparency with the American people,” Stewart said.

Rep. Rob Bishop, who isn’t plugged into Twitter, evaluated them on a tweet-by-tweet basis “when he sees them,” said Bishop spokesman Lee Lonsberry.

As for Sen. Mike Lee on Trump’s tweets, his office says he thinks about them rarely, if at all.