Stace Hall
Two Southern Utah University students reported "potential concerns" over a finger prick with a lancet during glucose screenings that were part of routine health screenings conducted at a Salvation Army site in Las Vegas in late October.

CEDAR CITY — Two Southern Utah University students reported "potential concerns" over a finger prick with a lancet during glucose screenings that were part of routine health screenings conducted at a Salvation Army site in Las Vegas in late October.

The students were part of a group helping conduct the screenings as part of a "cultural immersion trip" offered by an on-campus organization.

According to a statement issued by the university, "the concern, involving a finger prick with a lancet," potentially involved the two students and up to four people who underwent the screenings.

Citing privacy concerns, SUU released few details about the incident, but officials said it would provide an update as more information becomes available.

Once SUU officials learned of the issue, "the university immediately took aggressive precautionary measures to ensure the health and safety of its students and the individuals participating in the health screenings, including testing and preventive medical treatment," the statement continues.

Presently, the university has no information that there is a health risk to students or participants, and the inquiry is ongoing, the university said in a statement.

“The health and safety of our students and screening participants is our highest priority,” SUU President Scott L Wyatt said in the statement.

“The university is concerned and is taking every precaution to ensure the health of our students and the screening participants while we continue to look into this matter.”

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Test results may not be available for several months, the statement said.

The university has been working with the Las Vegas Salvation Army to notify people who participated in the health screenings.

The university's Rural Health Scholars program regularly offers trips to Las Vegas during which students work in homeless shelters, serve food, conduct health screenings and shadow health care providers in specialty clinics.

"This is a great opportunity to experience an urban health care setting in an impoverished, underserved area," the program's website states.