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Douglas C. Pizac, Associated Press
Built in 1870, the combination city hall and firehouse is still decorated Sunday, July 26, 1998, after Pioneer Day festivities in Ophir, Utah. During its heyday, Ophir had drugstores, general stores, theaters, two schools and a post office. Today, only a few people reside there.

While the Beehive State's most populous areas might be obvious, its smallest towns span a slew of counties across the state.

The top six cities with the most people are in Salt Lake and Utah counties, but the 25 smallest towns are found across the state. Here are tidbits on each of them.

Population information is gathered from 2016 estimates by the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

25. Torrey

Population: 241

Location: Wayne County

Torrey is a gateway town for Capitol Reef National Park, according to its website.

24. Leamington

Joe Bauman, Deseret News Archives
One of eight or nine railroad crossings in the small town of Leamington.

Population: 231

Location: Millard County

Leamington experienced "boom time when the huge Intermountain Power Plant was built at Lynndyl, from the early to the mid-1980s," according to the Deseret News.

23. Boulder

Spenser Heaps, Deseret News
Jake Heiner and Jeremy Strebel work on the Hell's Backbone Farm in Boulder on Saturday, July 8, 2017.

Population: 225

Location: Garfield County

Boulder was named after a nearby mountain and "rests at an elevation of nearly 7,000 feet," according to the Deseret News.

22. Bryce Canyon City

Tom Smart, Deseret News
New housing in Bryce Canyon City on Sept. 26, 2007.

Population: 223

Location: Garfield County

At the entrance of Bryce Canyon National Park, the city's Ruby's Inn employs 600 workers at the peak season with the park's more than a million tourists yearly, according to the Deseret News.

21. Henrieville (tie)

Population: 220

Location: Garfield County

Kodachrome Basin State Park located near Henrieville includes sedimentary monoliths "left standing like sentinels by the action of the wind," according to Atlas Obscura.

21. New Harmony (tie)

Population: 220

Location: Washington County

New Harmony is surrounded by Pine Mountain, Bumblebee Range and Kolob Canyon, according to the town's website.

19. Hanksville

Population: 214

Location: Wayne County

An excavation team found four long-necked sauropods, two carnivorous dinosaurs and a possible herbivorous Stegosaurus near Hanksville in 2008, according to the Deseret News.

18. Interlaken

Population: 209

Location: Wasatch County

Interlaken sits above Midway and became a town in 2015, according to KPCW.

17. Independence

Population: 204

Location: Wasatch County

16. Clawson

Population: 190

Location: Emery County

Clawson got its name after The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' apostle Rudger Clawson, who arrived and organized a ward, according to "Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints."

15. Woodruff

Lee Benson, Deseret News
The sign at the entrance to Woodruff.

Population: 188

Location: Rich County

The temperature in Woodruff "plunged to 50 below zero on Feb. 6, 1899 — still the state record for lowest recorded temperature in a municipality," according to the Deseret News.

14. Junction

Population: 174

Location: Piute County

Junction was first known as City Creek when it was originally settled in 1880, according to piute.org.

13. Snowville

Fox and Symons
The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, circa 1898-1901: left to right, first counselor George Q. Cannon, President Lorenzo Snow, second counselor Joseph F. Smith.

Population: 172

Location: Box Elder County

This Box Elder County city is named for Lorenzo Snow, the fifth president of the LDS Church, according to the Deseret News.

12. Cannonville (tie)

Population: 169

Location: Garfield County

The town was locally known as "Gun Shot" in the 1930s because settlers said "it was not large enough to be a cannon," according to the Deseret News.

12. Tabiona (tie)

Scott G Winterton
Tabiona and Bryce Valley play for the 1A state championship in Richfield on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017.

Population: 169

Location: Duchesne County

Tabiona High School girl's basketball made the Utah 1A championship game in the 2016-17 season, according to the Deseret News.

10. Kingston

Population: 158

Location: Piute County

9. Dutch John

Population: 151

Location: Daggett County

The 10-day, human-caused Mustang Fire in 2002 burned more than 20,000 acres of forest and forced residents of Dutch John to evacuate, according to the Deseret News.

8. Hatch

Population: 140

Location: Garfield County

Meltiar Hatch Sr. and his two wives, Parmelia Snyder Hatch and Mary Ann Ellis Hatch, settled Hatch in the 1870s, according to OnlineUtah.com.

7. Fairfield

Population: 136

Location: Utah County

Fairfield's Stagecoach Inn — now a museum — was once a stop on the Pony Express Route, according to the Utah Department of Natural Resources.

6. Alton (tie)

Population: 119

Location: Kane County

6. Antimony (tie)

Ravell Call
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Sydnee Dickson talks about their names as she greets student Sydney during a tour of Wasatch Elementary School in Clearfield on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017.

Population: 119

Location: Garfield County

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Sydnee Dickson attended a two-classroom schoolhouse growing up in Antimony, according to the Deseret News.

4. Lynndyl

Population: 113

Location: Millard County

The Beehive State's fourth smallest town was "settled in 1907 as a stop on the railroad," according to Untraveled Road.

3. Brian Head

Population: 89

Location: Iron County

The ski resort at Brian Head has peaks (Brian Head Mountain rises to 11,307 feet) and "plenty of snow (400-plus inches a year)," according to the Deseret News.

2. Ophir

Douglas C. Pizac, Associated Press
Built in 1870, the combination city hall and firehouse is still decorated Sunday, July 26, 1998, after Pioneer Day festivities in Ophir, Utah. During its heyday, Ophir had drugstores, general stores, theaters, two schools and a post office. Today, only a few people reside there.

Population: 55

Location: Tooele County

Now packed with summer cabins, Ophir was once a mining town with drugstores, general stores, theaters, two schools and a post office.

1. Scofield

Stuart Johnson, Deseret News
Greese fly off from Scofield Reservoir.

Population: 23

Location: Carbon County

Utah's smallest town is located 7,800 feet above sea level near "Scofield Reservoir in the heart of some of Utah's prettiest mountains," according to the Deseret News.