Family photo
Anxious to deliver her daughter, Kaylee Bays, a clerk in the 4th District Court, asked a judge to sign an eviction notice ordering the infant to be born. The baby, Gretsel Hansen, was born 12 hours later on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017.

AMERICAN FORK — Eager to deliver her daughter, a 4th District Court clerk asked a judge to sign an eviction order urging the child to be born.

It worked.

Wednesday morning, just 12 hours after Judge Lynn Davis issued the court order, baby Gretsel Hansen was born at American Fork Hospital, well within the three-day deadline set by the judge.

In a statement released by the hospital, the child's mother, Kaylee Bays, said her newborn daughter "didn't want to be in contempt of court."

Bays, of Provo, began experiencing contractions on Monday, two weeks shy of her due date, and "thought for sure it was baby time." When the pains stopped, an exhausted Bays returned to work on Tuesday.

"I was bummed all out," said Bays, who was met by a barrage of questions from her co-workers. "Finally I got fed up and said, ‘You know what, I'm going to sign an eviction notice for this little girl.'"

Bays drafted the order, then asked Davis to sign it.

"We have this running joke that if any order ever needs to be signed, Judge Davis will do it," Bays said.

The judge laughed, saying it was the first time in 31 years on the bench that he signed an eviction notice for a fetus, but that he was happy to help, Bays said.

The signed and stamped eviction notice, addressed to baby Gretsel at "Mommy Belly Lane," informed the infant she had three days to vacate the premises.

The order explained that the baby had "committed a nuisance" and that "Mommy is uncomfortable and running out of room for you! Too much heartburn and rib kicking, and I'm sick of waddling!!!"

The remainder of the order appeared as a regular eviction notice, explaining the legal ramifications of failing to comply and instructing the tenant to "contact your landlord to discuss the situation."

When Bays again started experiencing contractions just hours later, it took a moment to believe that this time her daughter was really on her way.

"It was just a running joke throughout the hospital all day," Bay said, including for doctors who said they intend to send their overdue patients to Davis to have an order signed.

Bays also got an email from Davis who said he was "tickled pink" that Bays' plan had worked.

Davis has requested a framed copy of the order, Bays said, and the original will be saved in a book for baby Gretsel. The baby is Bays' third child but her first daughter.

"I just think it's great that there are judges who have a great sense of humor, and we all get along wonderfully down here," Bays said. "It's great that we have support and that kind of joking relationship within the courthouse."

Contributing: Brianna Bodily