Elise Amendola, Associated Press 
FILE - In this March 3, 2017, file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., center, smiles during a small business roundtable discussion in Lawrence, Mass. At left is Rep. Niki Tsongas, D-Mass., and at right is Lawrence Mayor Daniel Rivera. The Senator won't face re-election until November2018, but two Republicans have announced their candidacies, two others are said to be weighing runs and conservative political groups are chipping away at the candidate. Still, Warren enjoys enormous advantages, including a national base of support, a fat campaign account and solid poll numbers.

BOSTON (AP) — U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren won't face voters for more than a year, but the broad outlines of the effort to unseat the Massachusetts Democrat, and her re-election pitch to voters, are taking shape.

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Two Republicans have announced their candidacies, two others are said to be weighing runs and conservative political groups are chipping away at the candidate.

Still, Warren enjoys enormous advantages, including a national base of support, a fat campaign account and solid poll numbers.

Warren reported having a hefty $11 million in cash in her campaign account as of the end of June.

Hanging over everything is the question of whether Warren will run for the White House in 2020.

Warren insists the only campaign she's focused on is next year's re-election bid.