Westminster College
Westminster College has once again been ranked as one of “The Best 382 Colleges” in the nation by The Princeton Review — and will be included in its 2018 annual college guide.

SALT LAKE CITY — Westminster College has once again been ranked as one of “The Best 382 Colleges” in the nation by the Princeton Review — and will be included in its 2018 annual college guide. Only 15 percent of the country’s 2,500 four-year colleges are awarded this distinction.

Westminster was also ranked No. 16 in the nation for “Best Science Lab Facilities,” and was named a “Best Western” college and a “Green College.”

According to a press statement, this year’s survey highlighted the accessibility and personalized attention of Westminster’s faculty. Responders stated Westminster’s small size provides students with “intimate classes” and “professors who truly care about their students.”

“We pride ourselves in the devotion of our educators and are truly pleased that this ranking reflects that dedication,” Stephen Morgan, Westminster president, said in the statement. “We are also honored to receive recognition for our science labs, which have been designed to facilitate active and engaged student learning.”

Published annually since 1992, “The Best 382 Colleges” guide includes detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores for all schools in eight categories, plus ranking lists of top-20 schools in the book in 62 categories based on the Princeton Review's surveys of students attending the colleges.

The Princeton Review does not rank the colleges from 1 to 382 in any category. Instead, it uses students' ratings of their schools to compile 62 ranking lists of top 20 colleges in the book in various categories.

Comment on this story

The lists in this edition are entirely based on the Princeton Review's survey of 137,000 students (about 358 per campus on average) attending the colleges. The 80-question survey asks students to rate their schools on several topics and report on their campus experiences at them. Topics range from their assessments of their professors as teachers to opinions about their school's library, career services and student body's political leanings. The Princeton Review explains the basis for each ranking list at princetonreview.com.