1 of 4
Deseret Book
“Women of Faith in the Latter Days, Vol. 4, 1871-1900” is edited by Brittany Chapman Nash and Richard E. Turley Jr.

"WOMEN OF FAITH IN THE LATTER DAYS, Vol. 4, 1871-1900," edited by Brittany Chapman Nash and Richard E. Turley Jr., Deseret Book, $34.99, 364 pages (nf)

“Women of Faith in the Latter Days, Vol. 4, 1871-1900” is a truly remarkable read, one that can delight any history lover. While the lives of prolific LDS women, such as Camilla Kimball and Belle Spafford, are touched on, it’s the biographies of lesser-known women that make this book a treasure.

Amanda Allen, one of the first women missionaries for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, endured public persecution in England while proselyting. Not only did she have to overcome her natural timidity, but she also had to continually clarify that LDS missionaries were in England to teach about Jesus Christ, not to lure women into being polygamous wives, a commonly held belief among the British.

Maria Mera chose to accept the gospel in war-torn Mexico. Her faith ultimately brought about such a huge public backlash from her neighbors that her brother was murdered in an emotional display of anti-Mormonism. But still, Mera never wavered and instead continued to hold church meetings in her home.

From an autobiography written exclusively in rhyme to living as one of the few black LDS members in Utah, this book teaches the indelible lesson that “Women of Faith” can be found in every continent and within every home; their stories only need to be shared.

With photographs gracing each chapter, this volume serves as a reminder that hardships come to all. As each of the 22 women highlighted reached into her well of testimony, she emerged triumphant; and by sharing those stories, readers are strengthened.

“Women of Faith in the Latter Days, Vol. 4, 1871-1900” shares true, well-researched histories. While some of the stories describe things such as racial tensions, murder and marital unfaithfulness, each is done in a respectful manner without any scintillating details.

Editors Brittany Chapman Nash and Richard E. Turley Jr. both work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Elizabeth Reid thinks the Great Depression is fascinating, so she earned bachelor's degrees in both economics and history. A wife and mother, she blogs at agoodreid.blogspot.com.