MAGIC – When aspiring musician Miguel (voice of Anthony Gonzalez) finds himself in the Land of the Dead, all he needs to return to the Land of the Living is a blessing from a family member, a magical marigold petal and a promise he’s not sure he can make. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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UNLIKELY DUET -- In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” aspiring musician Miguel (voice of Anthony Gonzalez) teams up with charming trickster Hector (voice of Gael GarcÍa Bernal) on a life-changing journey through the Land of the Dead. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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MARIGOLD BRIDGE — In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Miguel (voice of newcomer Anthony Gonzalez) desperately wants to prove his musical talent. But when he strums the guitar of his idol, the late Ernesto de la Cruz, Miguel sets off a mysterious chain of events and finds himself—and his loyal dog Dante—crossing into the Land of the Dead via a breathtaking bridge made of marigold petals. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, “Coco” opens in theaters Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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FAMILY REUNION – In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” aspiring musician Miguel (voice of Anthony Gonzalez) makes an impulsive choice that sets off a series of events that ultimately lands him in the Land of the Dead where he’s able to interact with his late family members, including TÍa Rosita (voice of Selene Luna), TÍa Victoria, PapÁ Julio (voice of Alfonso Arau), and TÍo Oscar and TÍo Felipe (both voiced by Herbert Siguenza). Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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THE LAND OF THE DEAD – In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” aspiring musician Miguel (voice of Anthony Gonzalez) finds himself in the Land of the Dead—a rich and vibrant community featuring bridges of marigold petals. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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GIVE THE DOG A BONE — An unlikely star of Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Dante is a Xolo dog—short for Xoloitzcuintle—the national dog of Mexico. Nearly hairless and missing some teeth, Dante has trouble keeping his tongue in his mouth. But he’s a loyal companion to Miguel, an aspiring musician who hopes to follow in the footsteps of his idol Ernesto de la Cruz. Featuring the voice of newcomer Anthony Gonzalez as Miguel and Benjamin Bratt as de la Cruz, “Coco” opens in theaters Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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FAMILY REUNION -- In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Miguel (voice of newcomer Anthony Gonzalez) finds himself magically transported to the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead where he meets his late family members, who are determined to help him find his way home. Directed by Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”), co-directed by Adrian Molina (story artist “Monsters University”) and produced by Darla K. Anderson (“Toy Story 3”), Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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NAME THAT TUNE – In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Miguel’s love of music ultimately leads him to the Land of the Dead where he teams up with charming trickster Hector. “Coco” features an original score from Oscar®-winning composer Michael Giacchino, the original song “Remember Me” by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, and additional songs co-written by Germaine Franco and co-director/screenwriter Adrian Molina. Also part of the team is musical consultant Camilo Lara of the music project Mexican Institute of Sound. In theaters on Nov. 22, 2017. © 2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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Progression Image 3 of 3: Final Frame ASPIRING MUSICIAN — In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Miguel (voice of newcomer Anthony Gonzalez) dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like the celebrated Ernesto de la Cruz (voice of Benjamin Bratt). But when he strums his idol’s guitar, he sets off a mysterious chain of events. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, “Coco” opens in theaters Nov. 22, 2017.
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The new short film called “Olaf’s Frozen Adventure” will show before Disney/Pixar’s upcoming “Coco” film, which will be released on Nov. 22.
Screenshot

SALT LAKE CITY — Pixar’s new film “Coco” has swept the nation by storm.

The Disney/Pixar movie, which debuted in theaters last week, earned the top spot at the box office over the weekend, racking up $71.2 million and landing ahead of “Justice League,” according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The Hollywood Reporter also stated that the film finished as the fourth-best Thanksgiving opening of all time, sitting only behind other animated films “Toy Story 2,” “Frozen" and “Moana."

So far, "Coco" — which had some design and development help from a Brigham Young University graduate — has a 97 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, for both its rating and audience score. Critical reviews have also been widely positive.

But people still have one problem with the film — the 21-minute "Frozen" spin-off short that played prior to the film.

Most Pixar films come with a short movie beforehand. There was 2010's "Day and Night" before "Toy Story 3," "For The Birds" kicked off 2001's "Monsters, Inc." and the singing volcano ("Lava") that played before 2015's "Inside Out" to name just a few. So, a short featuring characters from the extremely popular 2013 film "Frozen" seemed a sure bet.

But “Olaf's Frozen Adventure” wasn't intended to be a short. It was originally supposed to be a TV holiday show, but, for some reason, Pixar decided to run it alongside "Coco."

And it proved to be a little too much for some. The short, unlike "Coco," has not seen the bright side of a review. It currently has a 42 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

“We are creatures of habit, and ‘Olaf’s Frozen Adventure’ eventually feels like the grinning house guest who won’t leave, even though the party was supposed to clear out long ago,” according to The Washington Post. “As each successive song in the four-tune reel cues up, moviegoers’ reactions can be heard to switch from laughing irritation to growing mockery to outright anger.”

Social media hounded the short film for its length and inability to sustain audiences' attention.

https://twitter.com/ChandlerWayz/status/933188101236805637

According to Brittany Levine Beckman writing for Mashable, some have speculated that Disney and Pixar added the short to improve audience numbers, concerned not enough people were familiar with the Mexican holiday, Dia de los Muertos.

That didn't sit well with social media, either.

In fact, some Mexican theaters have stopped showing the short film altogether.

In the end, people seem to be saying "no" to the short film.

"Indeed, let me watch a beautiful, diverse Pixar movie without having to sit through some 'Frozen' mediocrity. American theater chains should take a cue from Mexico and put Olaf on ice," wrote Levine Beckman.