John A Trax Jr, 66689762
A Christmas tree cut and ready to move at a tree farm

Good luck trying to buy a Christmas tree this year.

Multiple reports from across the country indicate that there will be a shortage of Christmas trees this year. And that might lead to higher prices.

Indeed, droughts in North Carolina, as well as wildfires in Oregon, have thinned out the amount of Christmas trees available this year, according to GWDForestry.

For example, the Charlotte Observer reported they’ve received fewer trees this year and sellers are running out before Christmas.

And, according to WSMV-TV in Nashville, there’s another reason for the shortage: Christmas trees sold today were planted 10 years ago. But 10 years ago, the economic recession made families less interested in buying Christmas trees.

“Now that the economy has bounced back and more people plan to buy Christmas trees again, we're left with a high demand for trees, and a low supply — meaning tree prices are expected to go up,” according to WSMV-TV.

Still, if you can buy a Christmas tree, you might want to wait until it's closer to the holiday. Quartz recently reported on new Square data that found you’ll pay less money for trees the closer it gets Christmas.

Prices for Christmas trees are often at their high around Black Friday (hovering around $66). Christmas Eve reveals the lowest price ($30).

Tree prices are more expensive earlier in the season because shoppers buy the better trees earlier, leaving lesser trees waiting for late shoppers.

“Buying a tree two weeks earlier also means two extra weeks of twinkling Christmas lights and the aroma of pine in your living room,” according to Quartz. “So a tree’s price isn’t just a reflection of quality, but also of a premium placed on the ‘Christmas spirit’ that comes with it.”