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The eggs — which come from the Italian company Ferrero International, the company that makes Nutella — were originally banned from the United States by the Federal Drug Administration.

Kinder eggs are coming to the United States. So prepare to see them pop into your Christmas stockings.

The eggs — which come from the Italian company Ferrero International, the company that makes Nutella — were originally banned from the United States by the Federal Drug Administration, the company said in a press release.

The FDA specifically banned the eggs because it was a choking hazard, since the eggs traditionally carry a toy inside, according to Fox News.

The American version of the eggs, which will be called “Kinder Joy,” will be a little different than the ones you’ll find overseas, as they will have two halves — one with pure chocolate, one with a toy, the company said in a press release.

You guys! Look what is now available in America! #kinderjoy

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“Kinder Joy is a new way for parents to add a little surprise to their kid's day with a unique two-in-one product that offers a delicious treat with an added little surprise,” the company’s press release said.

The toys included with the eggs will be for ages 3 years old and up, the company said. And they will be unique in encouraging creativity.

The company will also provide special licensed and seasonal toys, the company said.

"When you're a kid, every surprise counts, especially the little ones. Kinder Joy is a fun new way to help parents bring little surprises to their kids anytime they want," Paul Chibe, CEO of Ferrero North America, said in a statement. "The delicious, unique taste of Kinder Joy and the wide variety of toys will delight kids, while mom and dad will be surprised by the high quality of the confection and toys — it's unlike anything currently on the U.S. market."

Swedish actress Malin Akerman partnered with Kinder to promote the treat. She told Today that the confection has a personal connection for her, so she wants everyone to experience the chocolate.

"I remember my grandfather giving me my first Kinder treat," Akerman told TODAY in an email. "It’s such a delicious, distinct taste every time I eat Kinder chocolate now, it takes me back to my childhood. And now, I get to share that moment with my son and watch his face light up when he opens his first Kinder Joy."