Matt Sayles, Invision
In this Monday, Nov. 5, 2012 photo, musician Kelly Clarkson poses for a portrait in Los Angeles. Clarkson's newest album, "Greatest Hits: Chapter One," is releasing on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)

Kelly Clarkson said in a recent interview that being skinny doesn’t always mean you’ll be happy.

The former “American Idol” winner spoke with Attitude magazine this week about her struggles with her weight, saying she hated her life when she was skinny.

Specifically, she said the years promoting her 2004 breakout album “Breakaway” were a “very dark time.”

“When I was really skinny, I wanted to kill myself,” she said. “I was miserable, like inside and out, for four years of my life. But no one cared, because aesthetically you make sense.”

Clarkson said she’d train at the gym all the time to stay in shape. But soon the heavy workouts wrecked her knees.

She said positive people helped her escape the dark time.

“I was around some really negative people, and I got out of it because I had a lot of great people there too. It was a case of turning around, facing them and walking toward the light,” she said.

As Time reported, Clarkson later took to Twitter to clarify some of her statements, saying that happiness and health doesn’t always equate to skinny bodies.

“Just to clear something up. I wasn't ever miserable because I had to be thin. I said I was miserable & as a result I became thin,” she wrote.

She also said, “I've never contemplated suicide because of my weight. I said people had no idea I was unhappy oddly enough because I appeared healthy.”

Clarkson, who has a new album scheduled for release this Friday, admitted to The New York Times last week that she didn’t have fun with her career when she first started out, either, because of some of the pressures of her music career.

But now, with her latest album, one she has always wanted to make, people around her admit they see a happier Clarkson, according to The New York Times.

“I’ve never seen her so fully happy with herself, personally, professionally, her music,” Sharon Dastur, a senior vice president at the radio company iHeartMedia, told The New York Times. “I think people have always not only just loved her voice, her music, but her. I think that goes a long way with fans, that she’s been the same genuine, super-talented person she’s been from the beginning.”