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YouTube launched its new streaming television service about four months ago. Originally, it only hit five markets, including New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia.

SALT LAKE CITY — Get ready Utah cord cutters: YouTube TV is coming your way.

YouTube launched its new streaming television service about four months ago. Originally, it only hit five markets, including New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia.

In August, YouTube TV launched its service in 14 new markets, The Verge reported.

Cities launched in August: Baltimore; Boston; Cincinnati; Columbus; Jacksonville-Brunswick; Las Vegas; Louisville; Memphis; Nashville; Pittsburgh; San Antonio; Seattle-Tacoma; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Sarasota; and West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce.

But now and in the new future, it will add 17 more markets, one of which is Salt Lake City, CNET reported.

Cities launching now: Austin; Birmingham; Cleveland-Akron; Denver; Grand Rapids-Kalamazoo-Battle Creek; Greensboro-High Point-Winston Salem; Harrisburg-Lancaster-Lebanon-York; Hartford-New Haven; Indianapolis; Kansas City; Milwaukee; Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News; Oklahoma City; Raleigh-Durham; Salt Lake City; San Diego; and St. Louis.

YouTube TV is a little different than the traditional YouTube app. For $35 a month, customers can stream national channels, such as ESPN and FX, as well as local TV stations like ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC.

All of these can be streamed to your TV, phone and computer, according to a company statement.

The app also allows DVR recordings. They are stored on the cloud without a storage limit.

YouTube also plans to launch original TV shows and movies, the company said.

To sign up, head over to tv.youtube.com for a free trial. You can download the service in Google Play stores and the Apple App store.

The act of cord cutting has been on the rise across the country, Recode reported. Pay TV subscribers lost 762,000 customers in the last three months for 2017.

In total, 1 in 5 U.S. households have dumped traditional cable in favor of streaming, Fortune reported.