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Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Bruce Kusch smiles during an interview in his office in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, a week after the announcement that he would become LDS Business College's 13th president. His inauguration is scheduled for Oct. 24.

SALT LAKE CITY — LDS Business College will inaugurate new school President Bruce Kusch on Oct. 24, the school announced Wednesday.

Kusch took over as the college's 13th president on April 17. President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, second counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, announced Kusch's appointment on Jan. 31.

The inauguration, which is open to the public, will take place at 11 a.m. in the Assembly Hall on Temple Square.

Kusch replaced J. Lawrence (Larry) Richards, who is now the director of special projects for LDS Church Commissioner of Education, Elder Kim B. Clark.

Members of the LDS Church Board of Education will participate in the inauguration, according to a news release. The board includes the entire First Presidency of the LDS Church, two apostles, a General Authority Seventy and the presidents of the church's General Relief Society and Young Women programs.

President Henry B. Eyring, first counselor in the First Presidency, and Elder Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and a business college alumnus, attended and spoke at Richards' inauguration in 2009.

President Eyring charged Richards to do five things:

• Keep LDS Business College firmly rooted in its spiritual heritage

• Awaken in all students an awareness of their boundless capacities to learn

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• Be an important and integrated part of the Church Educational System

• Seek recognition for the college and its students

• Treat every financial resource as if it were the widow's mite

LDS Business College annually educates about 2,200 students from all 50 U.S. states and more than 60 countries.

The school's role in the Church Education System is to train students to be job-ready in high-demand fields within one or two years.

One sign on campus reads, "If there isn't a job at the end of it, then we don't provide it."