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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press
In this July 19, 2017, file photo, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., center, walks to his seat as he attends a luncheon with other GOP Senators and President Donald Trump in the State Dinning Room of the White House in Washington.

SALT LAKE CITY — If Mormon voters didn't like Donald Trump in 2016, why didn't they, including prominent Latter-day Saint politicians, do more to stop him from reaching the White House?

That was the main message in an article written by Texas attorney Jason P. Steed for the Huffington Post on Monday.

"What if prominent Mormon Republicans like (Arizona Sen. Jeff) Flake and (Mitt) Romney had gotten serious about their opposition to Trump? What if they had provided more political and social cover for Mormon-Republican voters to stop Trump by voting for Clinton?" Steed wrote.

The article speculates how the 2016 election could have been different if Flake and Romney had been more outspoken in their opposition to Trump. Steed believes Mormons alone could have swung the results in a few key states by voting for Hilary Clinton, "but they didn't."

Romney and Flake were both vocal about their distaste for Trump prior to the election. In March 2016, Romney delivered a speech at the University of Utah where he called Trump "a phony, a fraud." Romney later said that he did not regret his comments about Trump but wished him well in his position as president.

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"I expressed honestly what my belief was with regards to temperament and character. Now the time has come for us to recognize we have a new president and we have hopes he will be successful leading our country," Romney said.

Flake's criticism of Trump also began long before the president took office. But Steed argues that their efforts were not enough.

"So most Mormon Republicans did what most non-Mormon Republicans did, in November: They held their noses and voted for Trump. Et voila. Here we are," Steed wrote.

Read the entire article here.