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Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
A friend of one of the shooting victims reacts as he talks to a Sandy police officer after a deadly shooting on Tuesday, June 6, 2017.

SANDY — A gunman opened fire on a car that pulled over to help a woman and children, leaving a boy, the woman and himself dead as schoolchildren on their way home scrambled for cover from the violence Tuesday afternoon, police said.

The suspect rammed his pickup truck into the car with five people inside, then got out and fired several times, witnesses told police. Someone called police to report a domestic incident, said Sandy Police Sgt. Jason Nielsen.

Another boy with critical injuries and a girl were both in the hospital in stable condition Tuesday evening, Sandy police said in a prepared statement.

The relationships of the people involved were not immediately released. Names were not being released pending notification of family.

Two bodies could be seen covered with sheets lying in the road near the corner of Alta Canyon Drive (8645 South) and Snowville Drive (2230 East) and possibly a third body inside a nearby SUV.

Police said they were still trying to figure out exactly what happened and were interviewing witnesses. Nielsen said officers believe there is no threat to the community.

The shooting happened about 3:45 p.m. When officers arrived, they found several people in the street with gunshot wounds.

Nearby Brookwood Elementary, 8640 S. 2565 East, was on lockdown for about an hour as police investigated, according to Canyons School District.

The school district asked that "anyone who is providing shelter to Brookwood students to please bring them to the school to be reunited with their families."

Parents pulled kids they didn't know into their cars and homes to keep them safe until police responded and cordoned off the scene, Canyons spokesman Jeff Haney said.

One of those children was Mat Hennings' son, who was thrown into a car by a woman trying to protect him. Hennings said he had just arrived home from work when he learned about the incident.

"A schoolteacher from Brookwood called us and said there'd been a shooting where my son walks up the street every day with all of his friends," Hennings said. "So I jumped in my car and I was probably (there) two minutes after the first policeman showed up."

Hennings was floored at news of the shooting.

"Seriously, it's a wonderful neighborhood," he said.

Andrea Workman described to reporters her 14-year-old son's frantic phone call telling her there had been a shooting.

"I yelled back, 'Where are you?' Workman said. "I thought he was at school. … Kids would have been walking up the hill at this time during the shooting. It's just terrifying to think about."

Her son told her what he saw after he stepped into the street.

"He didn't hear anybody yelling for help or crying," Workman said. "He said it was just too quiet, too silent."

Workman's son, Ridge, told reporters he had been home from school for about 30 minutes when he heard what sounded like fireworks. Then he saw several police cars on the block.

"It's just really upsetting because I might know these people who've been killed," Ridge said. "I'm just nervous for whatever family that is. My heart goes out to them and I hope they're OK."

Elizabeth Corbette said her 8-year-old son heard several gunshots and later saw the victims in the street.

"I was scared. I still don't know who it was — I don't know if my son knew them, I don't know if we (as a family) knew them," Corbette said.

Haney said grief counselors would be available at the elementary school Wednesday to speak with anyone affected by the tragedy.

Later Tuesday evening, about 50 people gathered at Brookwood Elementary to release paper lanterns into the air to honor the victims.

Contributing: Annie Knox