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Allison Niccum
Lone Peak's Micheal Cannon (9) trips up the runner and Ammon Hannemann (23) hits from the side.
I go to other schools and I say to myself, 'This is cool and all, but it's not BYU.' I just love BYU. I just know that it's the place for me, and I don't get that feeling anywhere else. —Connor Pay

The BYU football program is holding a camp this week in Provo, and the second day of it sure saw some intense action on the recruiting front.

Four players committed Tuesday to head coach Kalani Sitake and the Cougars, two for the 2017 class and two for 2018.

First up was Lone Peak High School offensive tackle Connor Pay, a 6-foot-5, 280-pounder who has decided to shut down his recruitment more than 19 months before he can sign a National Letter of Intent as part of the 2018 class.

Shortly after Pay committed, his high school teammate, safety Ammon Hannemann, was offered by assistant coach Ed Lamb and he committed on the spot.

The 6-1, 185 Hannemann, who will be part of the 2017 class, is the brother of former Cougar Jacob Hannemann and current defensive back Micah Hannemann.

Later in the afternoon, tight end Donovan Hanna (6-5, 225) of Queen Creek, Arizona, committed at the camp after receiving a scholarship offer from BYU three weeks ago.

Hanna's offensive coordinator at American Leadership Academy is former Cougar quarterback Max Hall, who suggested to BYU wide receivers coach Ben Cahoon in May that he go to Arizona to see Hanna.

Finally, 6-6, 280 offensive lineman Campbell Barrington of Spokane Valley, Washington, announced his commitment to the 2018 class on Tuesday night.

Barrington is the brother of offensive lineman Clark Barrington, who signed with the program in February.

As far as Pay is concerned, he chose the Cougars despite offers from Utah and Utah State, along with being in conversation with schools such as Stanford, Oregon and Boise State.

His father Gary and uncle Dennis played collegiately at BYU.

"I get a feeling when I'm down at BYU that I don't get anywhere else," he said. "I go to other schools and I say to myself, 'This is cool and all, but it's not BYU.' I just love BYU. I just know that it's the place for me, and I don't get that feeling anywhere else."

As for Hannemann, the Cougars are his first offer.

"Mostly everything they play for is just what I want to play for and do," he said. "The family (connection) is just a bonus."

After Tuesday's activity, four Lone Peak Knights are now committed to BYU, as Jackson McChesney and Preston Lewis had previously decided to be part of the 2017 class.

In Hanna's case, he hadn't had any contact with the BYU coaching staff before Cahoon visited his school last month at Hall's request.

"Coach Hall was a very big part in it," he said.

Like Pay, Barrington has also been receiving some interest from Pac-12 schools since getting a scholarship offer from Sitake in February, but being at the camp this week solidified his desire to join his brother in Provo.

"I'm LDS, so just kind of the gospel aspect to it is pretty cool, plus my brother's going to be coming there," he said as to the reasons he decided to commit.

All four of the players who committed Tuesday are planning on serving LDS missions.

There are now six players committed to the Cougars for 2017 and three for 2018.

Ryan McDonald is a sports reporter at DeseretNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @ryanwmcdonald.