Kristin Murphy, Deseret News
Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, leans back in his chair on the final day of the Legislature at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Thursday, March 10, 2016.

Thursday was the last day of the 2016 Utah legislative session. Here's what happened in the last couple of days.

Awaiting signatures from Gov. Gary Herbert:

  • HB437 (sponsored by House Majority Leader Jim Dunnigan, R-Taylorsville), which would expand Medicaid to the most needy, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB436 (sponsored by Rep. Francis Gibson, R-Mapleton), the Housing and Homeless Initiative, would provide $9.25 million in state and federal funds for the first installment of a proposed $27 million, three-year funding plan, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB2 (sponsored by Rep. Dean Sanpei, R-Provo), which would remove the waiting period for children of legal immigrants to become eligible for health insurance, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB101 (sponsored by Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden), which would allocate over $11 million towards expanding public preschool, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB251 (sponsored by Rep. Mike Schultz, R-Hooper), which would regulate the use of noncompete employment contracts, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB78 (sponsored by Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden), which will change how Utah's State School Board members are picked by implementing a nonpartisan election process for the 2016 general election cycle, and in future elections the process will be partisan, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB201 (sponsored by Rep. Marie Poulson, D-Cottonwood Heights), which would take SAGE testing out of the teacher evaluation process, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB200 (sponsored by Rep. Marie Poulson, D-Cottonwood Heights), which would allow high schools to not administer SAGE to 11-graders, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB149 (sponsored by Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden), which would allow Utah's grading system to adjust automatically as student proficiency improves, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB43 (sponsored by Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross), which would allow Utah parents to opt their children into a gun safety course, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB169 (sponsored by Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross), which would modify the Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund by prohibiting municipalities from adopting or enforcing ordinances that prohibit a homeless shelter from operating year-round, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB246 (sponsored by Senate Majority Whip Stuart Adams, R-Layton), which would "modify and enact provisions relating to funding for infrastructure projects," according to the bill, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB80 (sponsored by Senate Majority Whip Stuart Adams, R-Layton), which would modify infrastructure funding provisions, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • HB101 (sponsored by Rep. Fred Cox, R-West Valley City), which would no longer require that disabled adults have their own legal counsel when their parents are petitioning the courts to become their legal guardians, passed the Utah Legislature, after passing the Senate 15-10. (Deseret News)
  • HB87 (sponsored by Rep. Stephen Handy, R-Layton), which would gives $150,000 to set up a program that offers grants to people who convert their vehicles to clean burning fuel, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB234 (sponsored by Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo), which would require physicians to administer anesthesia to women for abortions after 20 weeks of gestation, passed the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • SB115 (sponsored by Senate Majority Whip Stuart Adams, R-Layton), which would remove policymaking decisions from the Public Service Commission and pass them off to the Utah Legislature, was defeated 33-40 in the House, then resurrected and passed 46-26, passing the Utah Legislature. (Deseret News)
  • Bills that failed:
  • SB77 (sponsored by Sen. Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake City), which would have expanded Medicaid to every Utahn, failed because it doesn't have the votes needed to pass, according to Davis. (Deseret News)

  • SB89 (sponsored by Sen. Evan Vickers, R-Cedar City), which would have legalized medical marijuana in Utah, failed in the House without a vote. (Deseret News)
  • SB163 (sponsored by Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Draper), which would have allowed parents to enroll their children in preschool earlier, failed a House committee. (Deseret News)
  • HB42 (sponsored by Rep. V. Lowry Snow, R-Santa Clara), which would have provided $10 million to expand optional extended-day kindergarten for at-risk students, didn't pass because of lack of funding. (Deseret News)
  • HB164 (sponsored by Rep. Kraig Powell, R-Heber City), which would have allowed teachers to use the SAGE test in calculating students' grades, died in a committee. (Deseret News)
  • HB28 (sponsored by Rep. Brad Last, R-Hurricane), which would have allocated $30 million for professional development for teachers, passed both Houses but wasn't included in the budget. (Deseret News)
  • SB189 (sponsored by Sen. Stephen Urquhart, R-St. George), which would have repealed the death penalty, passed a House committee, but stalled in the House. (Deseret News)
  • SB45 (sponsored by Sen. Alvin Jackson, R-Highland), which would have lessened the penalty for parents of truant students, failed in a 32-39 House vote. (Deseret News)

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