Gary Kazanjian, Associated Press
With a resume in hand, Cameron Hinojosa heads into the Family Clothes store looking for work in Fresno, Calif. An increase in jobs for teens is predicted for the second year in a row.
The job market is starting to improve around the country, albeit faster in some areas than others. —Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc

The number of teens with summer jobs should increase for a second year, according to a study by Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc.

Last year teens had 1.09 million jobs, up 13.2 percent from the previous year.

"The job market is starting to improve around the country, albeit faster in some areas than others,” the company said in a statement. “The accelerating recovery should prove beneficial to teenagers seeking employment this summer, as they are likely to face less competition from older, more experienced job hunters.”

Beginning a search now before school is out could serve as a great asset for teens. Even accepting less paying jobs — such as moving lawns or babysitting — or even volunteering can be a way to build their resumes early on, according to Challenger.

Employers often look for workers who are 16 to 19 years old because they can provide services at a cheaper rate. However, encouraging a teen to find a job may turn out to be more of a struggle as fewer teens desire to seek employment, Challenger said.

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