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A decade ago, the average American anticipated retiring at age 63. Now, Americans think they won't be able to retire until age 67, according to a recent Gallup survey.

A decade ago, the average American anticipated retiring at age 63. Now, Americans think they won't be able to retire until age 67, according to a recent Gallup survey.

The percentage of Americans who think their retirement will come after 65 is currently at 39, according to the survey. That's up from 12 percent in 1995 and 21 percent in 2002. Only 26 percent of nonretirees expect to be able to retire before they turn 65 and 27 percent expect to retire when they turn 65.

Americans are more than bleak about when they can retire. They believe it won't be comfortable, according to Gallup. Only 38 percent of the nonretired think they'll have enough money to comfortably retire, a new low. That's down from 42 percent in 2011. In 2002, 59 percent believed they could retire in comfort. The number has been under 50 percent since the Recession began.

The results are from Gallup's annual economy and personal finance survey, conducted from April 9-12.

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