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Charles Dharapak, File, Associated Press
FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, and South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, greet supporters at his campaign headquarters in Charleston, S.C. Romney faces a tough sell in the Deep South. With Mississippi and Alabama primaries coming up next Tuesday, there’s concern that he’s too slick, not really a conservative. In a region where the evangelical vote is important, some are skeptical about his Mormon faith. But for many Southerners, if he wins the Republican nomination and it’s a November choice between him and Barack Obama, he may be just good enough.

Further proving that money can't buy you everything, Mitt Romney and his supporters outspent Rick Santorum and his backers, $3.4 million to $220,800, on TV ads in Alabama and Mississippi leading up to Tuesday's primaries in those states.

And for all that money, Romney finished third in both primaries.

"Mitt Romney and the super PAC supporting him spent more than 15 times as much as Rick Santorum and the super PAC backing him," NPR reported Thursday, citing data from the Washington Post's interactive ad tracker.

To illustrate the enormous role super PACs are playing in the 2012 election cycle, consider these numbers: In the four weeks leading up to the Republican presidential primaries in Alabama and Mississippi, the official campaigns for Romney, Santorum and Newt Gingrich spent $200,030 on TV ads. The super PACs supporting the three candidates, meanwhile, spent more than $4 million on TV ads — meaning the super-PACs accounted for more than 95 percent of all ad buys while outspending the candidates' campaigns by a ratio of more than 20 to 1.