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Two missionaries in St. George, Utah, for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were woken abruptly by their host this week who told them their car was on fire, according to the Saint George News.

Two missionaries in St. George, Utah, for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were woken abruptly by their host this week who told them their car was on fire, according to the Saint George News.

The woman was making sausage at the time because she couldn't sleep, and that is when she saw the flames

"So I got up and went upstairs and went to the front door, and my goodness outside there was a fire truck out there with its lights going and some of them was over here and I could see sparks flying, over here by the missionaries’ car, and I thought, 'What is going on here?’ ” said Madge Carpenter.

The St. George Police Department responded at 12:30 a.m. and questioned neighbors who said there had been people running away carrying gas cans. St. George police are still searching for those who started the fire and say that it doesn't look to be hate or religiously motivated, though they aren't ruling the possibility out.

Coin Week featured a story about rare money that originated with Brigham Young in the 1800s.

According to the article, the Baltimore Paper Money Auction session will feature a rare Utah Reissued Kirtland Safety Anti-Banking Society $2 note, signed by Brigham Young in 1849.

"Considered by noted author Doug Nyholm as 'a Holy Grail' of Mormon paper currency, it is one of perhaps four of five known and the first sold at auction since July 2008. That $2 're-issued' note realized $40,350 as part of the Schingoethe Collection sales," according to author Stacks Bowers.

At the auction, there will also be four other rare notes.

The Spectrum, in Las Vegas, had an article that featured the first non-native structure to be built in the area — an old Mormon fort.

After Brigham Young sent missionaries to the valley in 1855, the 150-square-foot adobe fort was constructed.

"The missionaries brought their religion and new farming techniques to the local Southern Paiutes and explored the area for mining opportunities. In 1856, they established the first post office in what would eventually become the city of Las Vegas," according to the article.

After two years, the fort was abandoned. It then had a history with miners, possibly housed Union soldiers during the Civil War and later became part of a ranch, among many other various functions.

It now stands in the Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Park.

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