Eric Gay, File, Associated Press
FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2015 file photo, workers tend to oil pump jacks behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D. The Republican-controlled Congress is moving to overturn an Obama administration rule intended to clamp down on oil companies that burn off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

WASHINGTON — The Republican-controlled House has voted to overturn an Obama administration rule intended to clamp down on oil companies that burn off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

The rule seeks to reduce waste and harmful methane emissions as part of a strategy to address climate change. It was finalized in November.

But Republicans say the rule is forcing job losses in energy-dependent states across the West and is undercutting domestic energy production.

The House approved a resolution to reverse the rule on a vote of 221-191 on Friday. The measure now goes to the Senate.

Energy companies frequently burn off vast supplies of natural gas at drilling sites because it earns less money than oil. A government report said about 40 percent of gas being vented could be captured economically and sold.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

The Republican-controlled Congress is moving to overturn an Obama administration rule intended to clamp down on oil companies that burn off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

The rule, finalized in November, seeks to reduce waste and harmful methane emissions as part of a strategy by former President Barack Obama to address climate change.

But Republicans say the rule is forcing job losses in energy-dependent states across the West and is undercutting domestic energy production. The House began debating a resolution to reverse the rule on Friday.

Energy companies frequently "flare" or burn off vast supplies of natural gas at drilling sites because it earns less money than oil. A government report said about 40 percent of gas being flared or vented could be captured economically and sold.