U.S. Navy via AP, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Blake Midnight
In this image released by the U.S. Navy, the USS Mason (DDG 87), conducts maneuvers as part of a exercise in the Gulf of Oman on Sept. 10, 2016. For the second time this week two missiles were fired at the USS Mason in the Red Sea, and officials believe they were launched by the same Yemen-based Houthi rebels involved in the earlier attack, a U.S. military official said Wednesday. According to the official, the missiles were fired early Oct. 12 at the USS Mason that is conducting routine operations in the region, along with the USS Ponce, an amphibious warship. The official said that neither missile got near the ship.

WASHINGTON — American officials say U.S.-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles have destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast.

The retaliatory action follows two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at U.S. Navy ships.

The strikes marked the first shots fired by the U.S. in anger against the Houthis in Yemen's long-running civil war.

Officials haven't provided information on casualties from the U.S. missiles fired early Thursday.

A Pentagon spokesman says President Barack Obama authorized the strikes at the recommendation of Defense Secretary Ash Carter and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph Dunford.

Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook says in a statement that these were limited self-defense strikes conducted to protect U.S. personnel, ships and freedom of navigation.