Terry Chea, Associated Press
Neighbors look at the growing memorial of flowers, stuffed animals and notes left in memory of Madyson Middleton in Santa Cruz, Calif., Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The close-knit community of artists in Northern California are grieving the death of the 8-year-old girl whose body was found in a trash bin at their housing complex and expressed shock that one of their own, a teenage boy, has been arrested in her death.

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — A 15-year-old boy charged with murder, kidnapping and rape in the death of an 8-year-old neighbor at an artists' complex in a California beach town appeared in court briefly Thursday and was appointed an attorney.

Adrian Jerry Gonzalez wore a green T-shirt and khaki pants. His hands were shackled in front of him.

The teen did not enter a plea, and his arraignment was continued until Sept. 21. District Attorney spokesman Paul Mangasarian said the postponement likely was aimed at giving the defense more time to build a case

Larry Biggam of the Santa Cruz public defender's office was appointed as the teen's lawyer. Biggam has declined to comment.

Police say Gonzalez lured Madyson Middleton into his family's apartment from a courtyard where she had been riding her scooter over the weekend. Once inside, he tied her up, sexually assaulted and killed her, according a charging document.

Gonzalez remains in custody at the Santa Cruz County juvenile detention center, where he has been held since the girl's body was found in a recycling bin Monday evening.

"Unfortunately, the search for Maddy ended in the worst way possible," Santa Cruz District Attorney Jeffrey Rosell said.

He said Gonzalez has been charged as an adult and added that in his two decades in Santa Cruz, he's never seen a 15-year-old charged with murder.

The charges could send Gonzalez to prison for the rest of his life.

Neighbors at the Tannery Arts Center where both the suspect and Madyson lived said they were stunned by the death. The center is a public-private nonprofit that includes 100 affordable loft apartments for artists and their families. About 250 people live in the complex, including about 50 children.

"It's a great community because it's a bit unusual," said Geoffrey Nelson, a photographer and Tannery resident. "You share the joys of people, their children growing up. Their art shows, their recitals. But you also share the sorrows."

Nelson said he's known Gonzalez for several years and described him as shy, though they often chatted. "He was a yo-yo-expert, so he was oftentimes showing you tricks," Nelson said.

Residents have been heartbroken to learn that he is suspected in the death, he said.

"It wasn't somebody from the outside," Nelson said. "It was somebody we all knew. It was someone we all knew and liked."

Setorro Garcia, a Tannery resident who knew both the victim and suspect, said Gonzalez had been curious about the investigation.

"He kept asking, 'Any updates?'" Garcia said.

Another resident, Kirby Scudder, described Madyson as a typical 8-year-old, alternately shy and gregarious.

"She was very smart, and I thought she was going to be an engineer," he said. "She had a great sense of humor."

Madyson was headed for fourth grade in the fall.

She had a little black dog named "Lucy." On Wednesday, tearful children at the Tannery placed pictures and notes on a growing memorial overflowing with bouquets, stuffed animals, balloons and candles.

"It was nice how you were so perky," wrote one.

"We all miss you," wrote another, next to a picture of the slain girl with wings and a halo.

Associated Press writers Kristin J. Bender and Julia Horowitz in San Francisco contributed to this report.