Maya Alleruzzo, File, Associated Press
In this June 29, 2009 file photo, U.S. Army soldiers walk in a line at a reenlistment ceremony for a comrade in Baqouba, Iraq. New research published Wednesday, July 8, 2015 in JAMA Psychiatry shows war-time suicide attempts in the Army are most common in early-career enlisted soldiers who have not been deployed, while officers are less likely to try to end their lives. The study looked at data on nearly 1,000 suicide attempts among almost 1 million active-duty Army members during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, from 2004 to 2009.

CHICAGO — A big Army study says war-time suicide attempts are most common in newer enlisted soldiers who have not been deployed.

Officers are less likely to try to end their lives. And at both levels, attempts are more common among women and those without a high school diploma.

The study analyzed records on nearly 10,000 suicide attempts among almost 1 million active-duty Army members during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, from 2004 to 2009. Rates increased during that time.

Military suicides have gotten the most attention, but attempts are more prevalent and sometimes have different contributing factors.

The study was published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.