Rachel Denny Clow/Corpus Christi Caller-Times via AP
Darrell Mayo shoots video of the rough surf from Tropical Storm Bill on Tuesday June 16, 2015, at Galveston's 61st Street Fishing Pier as Tropical Storm Bill makes landfall near Matagorda Bay on the Texas Gulf coast.

12:05 p.m. CDT

Tropical Storm Bill has made landfall on the Texas coast along Matagorda Island, northeast of Corpus Christi.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Tropical Storm Bill had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph Tuesday morning as it came ashore about 90 miles southwest of Houston.

Last month flooding led to more than 30 deaths in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Texas climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon says May was the wettest month on record for the state, with an average rainfall of nearly 9 inches.

The National Weather Service says average rainfall through Wednesday evening for portions of Texas will be 3 to 6 inches but there could be as much as 12 inches in some isolated areas.

11:45 a.m. CDT

The National Weather Service says a flash flood watch has been extended from eastern Texas to central Illinois as Tropical Storm Bill is poised to make landfall along the Texas coast.

The weather service says Bill will move inland beginning Tuesday morning and bring heavy rain to much of Texas before moving northward into Arkansas and Oklahoma.

Flood warnings, meanwhile, have been issued for Indiana and portions of Kentucky and Ohio.

11:10 a.m. CDT

Forecasters are warning that a tropical storm set to make landfall on the Texas coast could spawn tornadoes as well as expected flooding.

Meteorologist Stephen Corfidi with the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, says the main threat from Tropical Storm Bill is flash flooding but that thunderstorms and tornadoes are possible along the storm's edge.

He says forecasters are fairly confident there will be a scattering of tornadoes in southeast Texas and western Louisiana on Tuesday. That threat will move northward into central Texas as the storm pushes inland.

Much of the area should receive up to 6 inches of rain but Corfidi says isolated spots could see up to a foot.

10:15 a.m. CDT

Tropical Storm Bill is about to make landfall on the Texas coast with sustained winds of up to 60 mph and heavy rain that's expected to bring widespread flooding to a state experiencing one of its wettest springs on record.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Tropical Storm Bill will come ashore Tuesday morning in the area of Matagorda County, about 90 miles southwest of Houston.

Residents have been asked to evacuate homes in low-lying areas coastal areas, schools in the Houston region are closed and people have been buying up bottled water and grocery staples ahead of Bill's arrival.

The National Weather Service says average rainfall for portions of Texas will be 3 to 6 inches but there could be as much as 12 inches in some areas near Austin.

8:05 a.m. CDT

The Houston Independent School District is closing schools and offices as a precaution as Texas prepares for Tropical Storm Bill to make landfall.

District officials say heavy rain could make driving dangerous on Tuesday afternoon. Schools and offices are expected to re-open at their regular times Wednesday.

Regular classes ended at the end of May but some Houston campuses have been running summer school classes since early June.

Tropical Storm Bill is expected to make landfall on the east coast between Baffin Bay, south of Corpus Christi, and High Island, up the coast from Galveston by Tuesday morning. The storm is expected to then move inland over the south-central part of the state.

3:50 a.m. CDT

The National Hurricane Center says Tropical Storm Bill will probably not become stronger before it makes landfall in Texas.

The storm's maximum sustained winds remain near 50 mph and Bill is expected to weaken as its center moves inland on Tuesday.

The tropical storm is centered about 55 miles southeast of Port O'Connor, Texas, and is moving northwest at almost 13 mph.

1:30 a.m. CDT

Tropical Storm Bill is expected to make landfall in Texas by morning then move inland over the south-central part of the state.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said early Tuesday that Bill was centered about 95 miles southeast of Port O'Connor, Texas, and about 120 miles south-southwest of Galveston, Texas. A tropical storm warning is in effect for the coast of Texas from Baffin Bay to High Island.

Bill had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph and was moving northwest at about 13 mph.

The center says some slight strengthening is possible before landfall, after which Bill is expected to weaken.

The storm was expected to produce rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches over eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma. Western Louisiana and western Arkansas could see 2 to 4 inches.

1 a.m. CDT

The eastern half of Texas is preparing for renewed flooding as Tropical Storm Bill approaches the Texas Gulf Coast.

The National Hurricane Center predicted the storm would make landfall Tuesday morning somewhere between Baffin Bay, south of Corpus Christi, and High Island, just up the coast from Galveston.

Galveston County officials already have directed voluntary evacuation of the low-lying Bolivar Peninsula, where Hurricane Ike wiped out most structures in 2008. School districts from Galveston to the Houston suburbs have canceled Tuesday's classes.

According to projections by the National Weather Service, parts of North Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma could get up to 9 inches of rain over the next five days, and Missouri could get more than 7.

The forecast follows historic rains and floods last month.