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Neil Scheibelhut/University of Hawaii at Manoa via AP
In this March 10, 2015, photo provided by the University of Hawaii at Manoa HI-SEAS Human Factors Performance Study, mission commander Martha Lenio collects a soil sample outside of the dome in which six scientists lived an isolated existence to simulate life on a mission to Mars, on the bleak slopes of dormant volcano Mauna Loa near Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii.

HONOLULU — Six scientists who have been living under a dome on the slopes of a dormant Hawaii volcano for eight months to simulate life on Mars have emerged from isolation.

The crew stepped outside the dome that's 8,000 feet up the slopes of Mauna Loa to feel fresh air on their skin Saturday. It was the first time they left without donning a space suit.

The scientists are part of a human performance study funded by NASA that's tracking how they work together as a team. They've been monitored by surveillance cameras, body movement trackers and electronic surveys.

Crew member Jocelyn Dunn says it feels awesome to have the sensation of wind on her skin. She says the first thing she wants to do is to go for a swim.