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The Associated Press
In an undated photo provided by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, team members crawl the area where a fossils of a jaw fragments and teeth of "Australopithecus deyiremeda" were found, searching for more pieces of the specimen. The fossil find in Ethiopia adds another twig to the human evolutionary tree, giving further evidence that the well-known "Lucy" species had company, researchers say.

NEW YORK — A fossil find adds another twig to the human evolutionary tree, and it gives new evidence that the well-known "Lucy" species had company in what is now Ethiopia.

The fossils are 3.3 million to 3.5 million years old. Researchers said they show that a second human ancestor lived in about the same area and time frame as Lucy's species.

Previously, fossilized foot bones found nearby had indicated the presence of a second species. Researchers said it isn't clear whether the foot bones belong to the same creature that the new fossils come from. The new find includes jaw and tooth remains.

In a report released Wednesday by the journal Nature, researchers named the new creature Australopithecus deyiremeda.

Online:

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature