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Alan Diaz, Associated Press
In this Wednesday, May 20, 2015 photo, a luxury high-rise condominium, left, is in the final phase of construction in Miami. Since eight hurricanes whipped through Florida a decade ago, causing $33 billion in insurance claims, the state’s coastal communities have added an additional 1.5 million people and almost a half-million new houses, an Associated Press analysis shows. But experts say the risk of catastrophic destruction hasn’t grown along with the new development because Florida builders are doing a better job of making structures hurricane-resistant.

MIAMI — It's been a decade since Florida got hit by a total of eight hurricanes in back-to-back seasons. The state's coastal communities have added 1.5 million people and almost a half-million new houses in that time.

But experts say the risk of catastrophic destruction hasn't grown along with the new development. That's because of the statewide building code that was implemented in 2002. New homes now get tough inspections and are built with shatter-proof glass and straps reinforcing the connection between roof and walls.

Back in 2004 and 2005, the eight storms created $33 billion in insurance claims.

More than two-thirds of Florida's 20 million residents live in coastal counties. The value of properties there has increased by $337 billion in the past decade and now stands at $1.5 trillion.