Jacquelyn Martin, File, Associated Press
In this Jan. 29, 2015 shows a photograph of Rosa Parks circa the 1950's and a paper written by Parks about segregation are some of the items in the Rosa Parks archive, seen during a media preview at the Library of Congress, Madison Building in Washington. The family of civil rights activist Rosa Parks is thankful her memorabilia and personal items finally have a safe home. The items are on loan to the Library of Congress. They were purchased last year by a charitable foundation run by Howard Buffett, son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

WASHINGTON — The family of civil rights activist Rosa Parks is thankful her memorabilia and personal items finally have a safe home.

The items are on loan to the Library of Congress. They were purchased last year by a charitable foundation run by Howard Buffett, son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

Parks' relatives viewed about 200 items Wednesday for the first time. Parks' niece, Sheila Keys of Northville, Michigan, says she's pleased the items are in "a place where students and the public could view it" and learn from her aunt's "humility."

Keys was most excited to see her aunt's family Bible, which contains the McCauley family's lineage. Rosa Parks' maiden name was McCauley.

"The Civil Rights Act of 1964" currently has just a few of Parks' items on display.