Markus Schreiber, Associated Press
A woman holds a flag with the Vatican and the Turkish national flags as she waits to see Pope Francis visiting Haghia Sofia, the Byzantine church-turned-mosque that is now a museum, in Istanbul, Turkey, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014. Turkey says that it has conveyed loss of trust in relations with the Vatican after Pope Francis called the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks "the first genocide of the 20th century."

ISTANBUL — Turkey says that it has conveyed loss of trust in relations with the Vatican after Pope Francis called the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks "the first genocide of the 20th century."

Turkey, which has long denied a genocide took place, immediately summoned the Vatican ambassador to express its displeasure.

In a statement following the meeting, Turkey said that the Pope's message had contradicted his message of peace and dialogue during a visit to Turkey in November. It said that a response would be forthcoming. The Foreign Ministry said that it had expressed "great disappointment and sadness."

The statement also called the Pope's message discriminatory because he only mentioned the pains suffered by Christian Armenians and not Muslims and other religious groups.