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Seth Wenig, File, Associated Press
In this Jan. 22, 2015 file photo, security police watch over the entrance to a federal courthouse in New York where the trial of a man charged with conspiring in the 1998 bombings that killed 224 people at two U.S. embassies in Africa is taking place. Fears over the terror attacks in Paris have raised security at the city's federal courthouses to levels not seen since the days following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

NEW YORK — As a terrorism trial gets underway for a lone defendant in twin bombings of U.S. embassies nearly two decades ago, fears over the terror attacks in Paris and unrest a world away have raised security at the city's federal courthouses to levels not seen since the days following the Sept. 11 attacks.

That includes assault rifle-toting federal guards at every entrance, Homeland Security vans surrounding the courthouses, and searches, metal detectors and sign-ins required for all trial visitors.

And in the long-term, a $10 million security pavilion is being constructed that will permit screening of visitors in August before they enter a 26-story courthouse.

Courthouse officials say they cannot speak about specific aspects of security. But they note that security has been routinely improved over time as needs are assessed.