Ben Margot, Associated Press
This Oct. 20, 2004 file photo shows the climbing face of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. Two men, Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy Caldwell, are roughly halfway through climbing El Capitan: a free climb of a half-mile section of exposed granite in California's Yosemite National Park. El Capitan, the largest monolith of granite in the world, rises more than 3,000 feet above the Yosemite Valley floor.

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — Two men are roughly halfway through what has been called the hardest rock climb in the world: a free climb of a half-mile section of exposed granite in California's Yosemite National Park.

Tom Evans, a climber and photographer, has been chronicling Kevin Jorgeson of Santa Rosa, California, and Tommy Caldwell of Estes Park, Colorado, as they scale their way using only their hands and feet. The men hope to be finished by Friday.

El Capitan, the largest monolith of granite in the world, rises more than 3,000 feet above the Yosemite Valley floor.

The men sleep in sling tents suspended to El Capitan's Dawn Wall.

Many have climbed Dawn Wall but the pair would be the first to climb the section using ropes only as a safeguard against falls.

Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com