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Eric Ogden, NBC
Silas Weir Mitchell plays Monroe who is aa Blutbad in NBC's "Grimm" and, right, David Giuntoli as Nick Burkhardt, a police detective who finds out he is a Grimm who helps keep the balance between humanity and mythical creatures.
Although entertaining, "Grimm" takes a gruesome twist on fairy tales and plays up the vivid scariness and nightmare-causing angles

NBC’s “Grimm” takes classic fairy tales, puts them in present day and adds in a bit of police detective work for a twist on the crime scene show procedural.

Portland homicide detective Nick Burkhardt (David Guintoli) is all set to propose to his girlfriend Juliette Silverton (Bitsie Tulloch) when he and his police partner Hank Griffin (Russell Hornsby) catch a grisly murder of a college co-ed on a jogging path that could be caused by man or animal.

Then his aunt, who helped raise him after his parents died and who is now dying of cancer, unexpectedly shows up with a Silvers Streak trailer in his driveway to essentially tell him everything he knew about the world isn’t as it appears.

Their family members are known as “Grimms,” who are charged with keeping the balance with the mythological creatures of the world. These creatures were apparently fodder for the Grimms Brothers fairy tales and the creatures blend in by taking the appearance of humans. Burkhardt gets glimpses of what they really look like under their human exteriors.

Between investigating the co-ed’s death (and she was wearing red) and the disappearance of a girl on her way home from school (who was also wearing red), Burkhardt slowly starts to navigate this new world and the balance of the mythological world. In the first espisode, he meets Monroe (Silas Weir Mitchell), a reformed Blutbad (aka big bad wolf) and clock repairman, who helps him after his aunt is unable to do so.

Although entertaining, “Grimm” takes a gruesome twist on fairy tales and plays up the vivid scariness and nightmare-causing angles of the tales rather than the happily ever afters and includes several violent deaths as it takes more bullets to kill one of these creatures. It also shows how seemingly normal, everyday people can potentially have a violent streak.

“Grimm” premieres this Halloween weekend on Friday at 8 p.m. on NBC.