State park museums celebrated

Utah state park museums will offer special events as part of Celebrate Your Museum Day Sept. 13.

Rock Cliff Nature Center at Jordanelle State Park will offer a workshop from 9 a.m. to noon. Participants will need leather gloves and clippers to collect plants and create fall crafts. Registration is required by calling 435-782-3030. Rock Cliff Nature Center is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a naturalist available to answer questions and help explore the center. Day-use fee is $7 per vehicle with up to eight people or free with a Utah State Parks Annual Pass.

Fremont Indian State Park and Museum staff will host a sneak peek of the new interactive children's area with a Fremont Indian pit house, rock-art wall and archeology lab. Staff and volunteers will be available to assist with crafts and tell stories 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Day-use fees are $6 per vehicle with up to eight occupants. Everyone visiting the museum receives a free VHS tape introducing Fremont Indian State Park. For more information, please call 435-527-4631.

More than 250 Utah museums provide cultural and educational opportunities for residents and visitors alike. Museums are the guardians of Utah's natural, cultural and artistic heritage. Join the nearly 7 million people who visit Utah's museums annually and experience historical objects, artwork and interesting plants and animals.

More light geese can be hunted

Utah hunters will be able to hunt light geese into March this season. At its August meeting, members of the Utah Wildlife Board approved Utah's first-ever spring, light-goose hunt. Light geese include snow, blue and Ross' geese.

The board also approved some duck hunting changes. Scaup and canvasback ducks are struggling this year. To help the birds, members of the board approved two changes:

• Canvasbacks may not be taken this season.

• The scaup season has been shortened to 86 days, and the daily scaup bag limit has been dropped to two a day. Utah's scaup season runs from Oct. 4 to Dec. 28. Scaup may also be taken on Sept. 27 during the Youth Hunting Day.

The board also approved a new waterfowl shooting time on the opening day of the state's pheasant hunt, which opens Nov. 1. Waterfowl shooting on Nov. 1 will begin at 7:29 a.m. In the past, waterfowl hunters could not begin shooting until 8 a.m. on the opening day of the pheasant hunt.

"We don't see many light geese in the fall, but in the spring, more than 50,000 light geese — most of them snow and Ross' geese — stop over in Utah," said Tom Aldrich, migratory game bird coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources. "In addition to providing hunters with a unique opportunity, hunting light geese in the spring will reduce the agricultural damage the geese are doing."

Aldrich said most of the damage is happening in Box Elder and Millard counties, where geese are feeding on grain and alfalfa crops that are starting to grow.

In addition to hunting light geese into the early spring, hunters can also take more light geese this season. Board members raised the daily light-goose bag limit to 10 and possession limit to 20.

Very few light geese use state waterfowl management areas or federal refuges in Utah. But some light geese do visit the Salt Creek Public Shooting Grounds and Clear Lake waterfowl management areas in the spring. These areas will be open to light-goose hunting in February and March.

The remaining waterfowl management areas in Utah — Brown's Park, Desert Lake, Farmington Bay, Harold Crane, Howard Slough, Locomotive Springs and Ogden Bay — are closed to light-goose hunting in February and March. The three federal refuges in Utah, Bear River, Fish Springs and Ouray, are also closed to light-goose hunting in February and March.

In addition to helping Utah's farmers, the light-goose hunt will also help the geese.

In the central part of North America, light goose populations have gotten so large that they're damaging the areas in Canada where they nest and raise their young.

"The population in the western part of North America hasn't become overabundant yet, but it's growing," Aldrich said. "In December 2007, for example, the population exceeded 1 million birds. We want to help stabilize the population before it gets too large. Once the geese become overabundant, it's hard to bring them back."

For information, call the nearest DWR office or call 801-538-4700.

Fishing, shooting at State Fair

Youngsters will be able to catch fish and shoot pellet guns atthis year's Utah State Fair.

The two activities are some of the things families will be able to to at the historic Division of Wildlife Resources building on the south side of the Fairpark. Youngsters will be able to catch and release bluegill, crappie, catfish and bass at the pond on the south side of the building, open from 4 to 7 p.m. every day of the fair except today. The DWR will provide all of the fishing equipment and instruction.

Youngsters can shoot at targets at the DWR's shooting trailer. Thetrailer will be open every day of the fair. Visitors can learn about various outdoor topics at a series of seminars covering black bear, OHV safety, the rocks that make up the Wasatch Mountains and wildlife art.

Visitors can also learn more about Utah's outdoors at various information booths inside the building. The Utah State Fair runs today through Sept. 14. The Fairpark is located at 155 N. 1000 West.

State park museums celebrated

Utah state park museums will offer special events as part of Celebrate Your Museum Day Sept. 13.

Rock Cliff Nature Center at Jordanelle State Park will offer a workshop from 9 a.m. to noon. Participants will need leather gloves and clippers to collect plants and create fall crafts. Registration is required by calling 435-782-3030. Rock Cliff Nature Center is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a naturalist available to answer questions and help explore the center. Day-use fee is $7 per vehicle with up to eight people or free with a Utah State Parks Annual Pass.

Fremont Indian State Park and Museum staff will host a sneak peek of the new interactive children's area with a Fremont Indian pit house, rock-art wall and archeology lab. Staff and volunteers will be available to assist with crafts and tell stories 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Day-use fees are $6 per vehicle with up to eight occupants. Everyone visiting the museum receives a free VHS tape introducing Fremont Indian State Park. For more information, please call 435-527-4631.

More than 250 Utah museums provide cultural and educational opportunities for residents and visitors alike. Museums are the guardians of Utah's natural, cultural and artistic heritage. Join the nearly 7 million people who visit Utah's museums annually and experience historical objects, artwork and interesting plants and animals.

More light geese can be hunted

Utah hunters will be able to hunt light geese into March this season. At its August meeting, members of the Utah Wildlife Board approved Utah's first-ever spring, light-goose hunt. Light geese include snow, blue and Ross' geese.

The board also approved some duck hunting changes. Scaup and canvasback ducks are struggling this year. To help the birds, members of the board approved two changes:

• Canvasbacks may not be taken this season.

• The scaup season has been shortened to 86 days, and the daily scaup bag limit has been dropped to two a day. Utah's scaup season runs from Oct. 4 to Dec. 28. Scaup may also be taken on Sept. 27 during the Youth Hunting Day.

The board also approved a new waterfowl shooting time on the opening day of the state's pheasant hunt, which opens Nov. 1. Waterfowl shooting on Nov. 1 will begin at 7:29 a.m. In the past, waterfowl hunters could not begin shooting until 8 a.m. on the opening day of the pheasant hunt.

"We don't see many light geese in the fall, but in the spring, more than 50,000 light geese — most of them snow and Ross' geese — stop over in Utah," said Tom Aldrich, migratory game bird coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources. "In addition to providing hunters with a unique opportunity, hunting light geese in the spring will reduce the agricultural damage the geese are doing."

Aldrich said most of the damage is happening in Box Elder and Millard counties, where geese are feeding on grain and alfalfa crops that are starting to grow.

In addition to hunting light geese into the early spring, hunters can also take more light geese this season. Board members raised the daily light-goose bag limit to 10 and possession limit to 20.

Very few light geese use state waterfowl management areas or federal refuges in Utah. But some light geese do visit the Salt Creek Public Shooting Grounds and Clear Lake waterfowl management areas in the spring. These areas will be open to light-goose hunting in February and March.

The remaining waterfowl management areas in Utah — Brown's Park, Desert Lake, Farmington Bay, Harold Crane, Howard Slough, Locomotive Springs and Ogden Bay — are closed to light-goose hunting in February and March. The three federal refuges in Utah, Bear River, Fish Springs and Ouray, are also closed to light-goose hunting in February and March.

In addition to helping Utah's farmers, the light-goose hunt will also help the geese.

In the central part of North America, light goose populations have gotten so large that they're damaging the areas in Canada where they nest and raise their young.

"The population in the western part of North America hasn't become overabundant yet, but it's growing," Aldrich said. "In December 2007, for example, the population exceeded 1 million birds. We want to help stabilize the population before it gets too large. Once the geese become overabundant, it's hard to bring them back."

For information, call the nearest DWR office or call 801-538-4700.

Fishing, shooting at State Fair

Youngsters will be able to catch fish and shoot pellet guns atthis year's Utah State Fair.

The two activities are some of the things families will be able to to at the historic Division of Wildlife Resources building on the south side of the Fairpark. Youngsters will be able to catch and release bluegill, crappie, catfish and bass at the pond on the south side of the building, open from 4 to 7 p.m. every day of the fair except today. The DWR will provide all of the fishing equipment and instruction.

Youngsters can shoot at targets at the DWR's shooting trailer. Thetrailer will be open every day of the fair. Visitors can learn about various outdoor topics at a series of seminars covering black bear, OHV safety, the rocks that make up the Wasatch Mountains and wildlife art.

Visitors can also learn more about Utah's outdoors at various information booths inside the building. The Utah State Fair runs today through Sept. 14. The Fairpark is located at 155 N. 1000 West.