LAYTON — The Layton city staff has drafted a preliminary agreement for the proposed Fort Lane Village, giving developers just over a month to negotiate with the city on the plan.

Community development director Bill Wright said in a City Council work meeting last week that the agreement will be taken up by the council at its Oct. 2 meeting. The agreement will expire if it's not approved.

City manager Alex Jensen said the staff decided to do a tentative agreement first to get the process going.

"This is an effort to put together a strong agreement for a mixed-use proposal," he said.

Landowners for the Fort Lane Village project include state Rep. Kevin Garn, R-Layton, and former state legislator Stuart Adams, co-owner with his brother of the Adams Co.

The City Council generally likes the draft agreement.

Adams said he just received a copy of the draft and hasn't had a chance to study it yet.

"The city's trying to be helpful," he said.

Layton's view of the development is upscale, almost "Gateway" like, pedestrian friendly, with lots of trees, some water features and no large blank building walls.

However, despite rumors, a Costco or similar store won't likely be a part of the plans for the old, historic shopping center near Fort Lane and Gentile streets.

Wright said bulk shopping isn't complementary to the mixed-use aspect of the development. A 150,000-square-foot big-box retailer is included in the agreement, but warehouse-type shopping would not be. It would be located on the southwest corner of the site.

Hotels and private clubs will not be permitted in the project. However, there could be a live theater.

The city believes the development must have a good connection to Wasatch Drive. Officials also want traffic-calming devices in place as well as pedestrian-oriented streets.

Because the developers only have about 25 acres to work with, Wright said, they might have to explore the use of structured parking.

"It may be necessary if a big retailer goes in," he said. Above- and below-grade parking would be allowed.

Storm runoff drainage on the development will also be significant.

"There will have to be some innovation on how to deal with this storm drainage," Wright said.