Associated Press
In this photo taken on Jan 18, 2012 and released by U.S. Navy, its aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln transits the Indian Ocean. USS Abraham Lincoln sailed through the Strait of Hormuz into the Persian Gulf on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012 without incident.

The following editorial appeared recently in the Seattle Times:

Hardball diplomacy and enlightened self-interest might get Iran seriously talking about its nuclear program. World leaders, and aspiring U.S. presidential candidates, please take note.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad can compete with bluster and bellicosity, but he is no match for a united front.

No one trusts Iran. No one. Its leaders can argue their nuclear intentions are benign — generating electricity and medical research — but the claims only make eyes roll.

The Obama administration aggressively challenged Iran's production of nuclear fuel and its path to nuclear weapons. America's persistent voice is important, but the stakes ramped up with the European Union's oil embargo.

Enlightened self-interest was not only registering in Tehran, but Beijing as well. Prime Minister Wen Jiabao ended a trip to the Middle East with blunt talk about Iran's nuclear program.

Iran's pretensions in the region already upset its neighbors, where the fault lines are religious as well as political. China does not want any distractions to complicate its economic ties with Saudi Arabia, its primary source of oil imports.

China finding its voice on the international stage will be seen as diplomatic competition, but it also represents potent leverage to be employed in exactly these circumstances.

The international community already called Iran's bluff by offering to provide reactor-ready fuel rods if it would get rid of its enriched uranium stockpiles. Iran brushed the offer aside.

No talks are scheduled, but the key players are likely to respond.