ATLANTA — Foot and leg amputations were once a fairly common fate for diabetics, but new government research shows a dramatic decline in limbs lost to the disease, probably due to better treatments.

The rate has fallen by more than half since the mid-1990s, according to what is being called the most comprehensive study of the trend.

For older diabetics, amputations dropped from more than 11 to about 4 per 1,000 people, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

Other diabetes studies have shown declines in lost toes, feet and legs, but not as dramatic.

"What jumped out to me was the scale of the improvement," said Dr. John Buse, a University of North Carolina diabetes expert who was not involved in the new study.

The study was released Tuesday by the medical journal Diabetes Care.

Diabetes is a disease in which sugar builds up in the blood. Roughly 1 in 10 U.S. adults has it, and it is the seventh leading cause of death, the CDC says.

Complications include poor circulation and nerve damage in the lower limbs, resulting in numbness and slow healing of sores and infections. That's most common in elderly patients and those with diabetes for at least 10 years.

While diabetes has been growing more common in the United States researchers have noted recent declines in some of the other most dreaded complications, including blindness and kidney failure.