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Wally Santana, File, Associated Press
FILE - In this March 24, 2011 file photo, a young evacuee is screened at a shelter for leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Japan's nuclear crisis has turned a 41-year-old mother into one of a small but growing number of Internet-savvy activist moms. In the days and weeks following the March 11 tsunami, frustration over the sketchy information coming from the government about the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant drove many Japanese to Twitter and alternative media webcasts.

TOKYO — Japan's nuclear crisis has turned Mizuho Nakayama into one of a small but growing number of Internet-savvy activist moms.

Public dismay with the government's response to this year's earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown is driving some Japanese to become more politically engaged.

It's the kind of grass-roots activism that some say Japan needs to shake up a political system that has allowed the country's problems to fester for years.

Nakayama connected with other mothers through Twitter and Facebook and joined a parents group that petitioned officials to test school lunches for radiation.

The 41-year-old mother said: "We're normally too busy to really raise our voices. But this time we felt compelled to speak up."