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Jose Luis Magana, AP Photo
Hundreds of demonstrators march in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, present on base at a military court hearing, outside Ft. Meade, Md., Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011. Prosecutors began presenting their case that Manning was the source of the WikiLeaks website's collection of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets.

FORT MEADE, Md. — Lawyers representing the young Army intelligence specialist accused of leaking U.S. military and diplomatic secrets say his struggles with being a gay soldier influenced his actions.

Pfc. Bradley Manning, 24, is accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of sensitive items to the anti-secrecy online group WikiLeaks, including Iraq and Afghanistan war logs, State Department cables and a military video of a 2007 American helicopter attack in Iraq.

Prosecutors at the pretrial hearing are expected to call more witnesses Sunday as they build their case to connect Manning to the publication of the material by WikiLeaks. The hearing is being held to determine whether Manning will be court-martialed on 22 counts, including aiding the enemy.