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Russell Contreras, Associated Press
Cynthia Vigil Jaramillo, 33, a victim of convicted sex torturer David Parker Ray, speaks Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, at an FBI press conference in Albuquerque, N.M. about her kidnapping and torture in 1999. Ray was arrested in March 1999 after Jaramillo, naked and wearing only a dog collar and chain, fled Ray's home. Jaramillo told authorities that Ray tortured her, and he was later convicted of sex torture in 2001 and died in prison a year later.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Federal authorities released Friday a photo of a woman who they believe was another victim of convicted sex torturer and suspected serial killer David Parker Ray.

The photo from a fake ID was found in Ray's possession and FBI officials believe the unknown woman might have been one of many of Ray's victims.

"We have a suspicion that this woman may have had contact with him," said FBI spokesman Frank Fisher at a press conference in Albuquerque. "And we would really like to know what her name was, and if we could talk to her."

The image is part of a new poster campaign by the FBI as agents seek more information on missing women who they believe may have been forgotten victims. Also on the poster is Jill Troia, an Albuquerque woman who disappeared 16 years ago and was last seen leaving an Albuquerque restaurant with Ray's daughter.

Ray was arrested in March 1999 after Cynthia Vigil Jaramillo, naked and wearing only a dog collar and chain, fled Ray's home. Jaramillo told authorities that Ray tortured her, and he was later convicted of sex torture in 2001 and died in prison a year later.

Authorities said Ray wrote of having some 40 victims, and FBI agents believe he may have killed some and buried bodies in a remote area of drought-lowered Elephant Butte Reservoir. However, no bodies have ever been found.

Recently, FBI agents and local law enforcement authorities have been refocused on the case and searched Elephant Butte last month after a hiker found a human leg bone.

FBI officials also recently released photographs of various items, like bracelets and rosaries, taken as evidence from Ray's home.

The photographs, which were recently posted on the FBI's website, have been tweeted and reposted on Facebook — tools that have helped the FBI solve other cold cases, Fisher said.

Similar campaigns that used social media have helped authorities capture gangster James "Whitey" Bulger, who was on the FBI's Most Wanted List, Fisher said. A tipster in Iceland led the FBI to Bulger and his girlfriend in California following a publicity campaign that included social media announcements.

On Friday, Jaramillo, now 33, spoke to reporters about her kidnapping by Ray and said he bragged to her that he had killed some of his victims. She pleaded with the public to help find possible missing women.

"These people need to be returned to their families, whether they're gone or not," an emotional Jaramillo said Friday. "They didn't have to go through what I went through but they did. And they probably didn't make it (out) like I did."

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