JuanMabromata/Afp/Getty
Maria Eugenia Sampallo Barragan, left, leaves court after the people involved in her kidnapping were sentenced in Buenos Aires on Friday. Barragan's case marked the first time a child of a dissident who was "disappeared" during Argentina's "dirty war" had taken her adoptive parents to court. Thousands of dissidents vanished after being abducted by security forces, and more than 200 of their children were given to military or politically connected families to raise when a military junta ran the country from 1976-83. DNA tests allowed some of them to find out who their parents were.

Maria Eugenia Sampallo Barragan, left, leaves court after the people involved in her kidnapping were sentenced in Buenos Aires on Friday. Barragan's case marked the first time a child of a dissident who was "disappeared" during Argentina's "dirty war" had taken her adoptive parents to court. Thousands of dissidents vanished after being abducted by security forces, and more than 200 of their children were given to military or politically connected families to raise when a military junta ran the country from 1976-83. DNA tests allowed some of them to find out who their parents were.