Armando Trovati, Associated Press
U.S. skier Bode Miller shows off his World Cup overall crystal globe trophy Saturday in Bormio, Italy.

BORMIO, Italy — Manfred Moelgg and his sister celebrated at the World Cup Finals along with thousands of home fans.

The Italian captured the men's slalom title Saturday in the final race of the season, then his sister Manuela took second in the giant slalom, just seven-hundredths of a second behind the winner.

Moelgg led after the first run and finished tied for sixth, good enough for the title after pre-race standings leader Jean-Baptiste Grange of France slipped in the second run and finished last.

"It's an enormous joy, the crowning point on a perfect season," Manfred Moelgg said.

Barely an hour later, Elisabeth Goergl of Austria finished in a combined time of 2 minutes, 24.96 seconds to edge Manuela for the win.

"It's wonderful to be celebrating together with my brother," said Manuela, who battled the flu this week. "I am a little bit disappointed to have lost by .07 seconds. I could have won, but I'll take this. I am still not mature for my first win, I have to keep attacking like my brother."

Reinfried Herbst of Austria won the men's race, clocking 1 minute, 51.31 seconds for his second victory of the season. Overall World Cup champion Bode Miller of the United States skipped the race because of an injured hand. He was awarded his trophy Saturday.

American Lindsey Vonn, who won the overall title on Friday, had her second-best giant slalom finish of the season, coming in seventh. Denise Karbon of Italy secured the giant slalom title by winning five of six races earlier in the season. She finished eighth.

Grange had won three slalom races earlier this season, but Moelgg had the momentum after his first career victory last weekend in Kranjska Gora, Slovenia.

The Frenchman lost his balance at the bottom of the Stelvio course and nearly went out. Grange struggled back onto the course but finished last, nearly five seconds behind Herbst.

Moelgg then skied without taking risks to clinch the title, 19 points ahead of Grange.

"I went down at 80 percent," Moelgg said. "The turning point was last weekend winning in Kranjska Gora. My coach Claudio Ravetto actually told me I had to win there, and that's where I first believed I could win the cup."

Moelgg kept up a strong Italian tradition in slalom, with Alberto Tomba winning four titles from 1988-95 and Giorgio Rocca adding another in 2006. Gustavo Thoeni won two slalom titles in the 1970s.