Antarctica: Whaling resumes

Japan has resumed its annual whale hunt in waters near Antarctica now that anti-whaling activists have stopped pursuing the Japanese fleet, a news report said Tuesday.

Japan temporarily halted its hunt in mid-January after confrontations with both Greenpeace and the militant anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, according to Kyodo News agency.

France: President wins suit

PARIS — President Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife, Carla Bruni, who were married Saturday, won a lawsuit against Irish low-cost airline Ryanair, which was ordered to pay nearly $89,000 for an advertisement featuring a photo of the couple.

Sarkozy and Bruni filed separate lawsuits that were heard together in a court session in Paris, seeking damages for the carrier's use of the image for commercial purposes without permission.

Germany: Baby saved from fire

LUDWIGSHAFEN — Trapped by smoke, the parents of a 9-month-old baby girl faced an excruciating dilemma: if they threw her out of the window, would she be caught four stories below?

The split-second decision paid off: Onur fell safely into the arms of a policeman below. The parents also survived, although the mother was still in a hospital Tuesday, two days after the blaze that killed nine people, including five children.

The drama at a building in southwestern Germany was captured in a series of photographs of the baby in free-fall as a group of anguished adults, thick smoke billowing around them, looked on.

Kenya: Peace Corps pulls out

NAIROBI — The Peace Corps said Tuesday it has suspended operations in Kenya after weeks of postelection violence, another blow to confidence as business leaders voiced concerns over the turmoil's effect on the economy.

Unrest has devastated the nation's once-impressive economy, decimating its vital tourism industry and prompting foreign companies to consider pulling out, business leaders said.

The Peace Corps said it was withdrawing its remaining 58 volunteers. After clashes first erupted, 86 volunteers were sent home in January.

Netherlands: Beatles' guru dies

THE HAGUE — Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died Tuesday at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop, a spokesman said. He was thought to be 91 years old.

Once dismissed as hippie mysticism, the Hindu practice of mind control that Maharishi taught, called transcendental meditation, gradually gained medical respectability.

He began teaching TM in 1955 and brought the technique to the United States in 1959. But the movement really took off after the Beatles visited his ashram in India in 1968.

Somalia: Grenade kills 15

MOGADISHU — A grenade tossed into a house killed at least 15 people and wounded 50 others Tuesday in Somalia's northeastern Puntland region, an official said.

Most of those killed or wounded were Ethiopians believed to be on their way to find work in the Arabian Peninsula, which lies across the Gulf of Aden, said Muse Geele Yusuf, a senior official in the region.

Yusuf said police were searching for the attackers and trying to determine why the Ethiopians were targeted.

Uzbekistan: Amnesties granted

Authorities in Uzbekistan have granted amnesties to two prominent rights activists in what could be part of government efforts to mend frosty ties with the West.

Saidjahon Zainabitdinov, who spent nearly three years in jail, said Tuesday by telephone from his home in the city of Andijan that he was released on Monday under an amnesty approved by the ex-Soviet republic's parliament in November.

The November amnesty, which was declared in connection with the 15th anniversary of the country's constitution, also applied to another prominent rights activist, Umida Niyazova, ending her seven-year suspended sentence for distributing anti-government publications and illegal border crossing.

DESERET MORNING NEWS, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6, 2008

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Antarctica: Whaling resumes

Japan has resumed its annual whale hunt in waters near Antarctica now that anti-whaling activists have stopped pursuing the Japanese fleet, a news report said Tuesday.

Japan temporarily halted its hunt in mid-January after confrontations with both Greenpeace and the militant anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, according to Kyodo News agency.

France: President wins suit

PARIS — President Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife, Carla Bruni, who were married Saturday, won a lawsuit against Irish low-cost airline Ryanair, which was ordered to pay nearly $89,000 for an advertisement featuring a photo of the couple.

Sarkozy and Bruni filed separate lawsuits that were heard together in a court session in Paris, seeking damages for the carrier's use of the image for commercial purposes without permission.

Germany: Baby saved from fire

LUDWIGSHAFEN — Trapped by smoke, the parents of a 9-month-old baby girl faced an excruciating dilemma: if they threw her out of the window, would she be caught four stories below?

The split-second decision paid off: Onur fell safely into the arms of a policeman below. The parents also survived, although the mother was still in a hospital Tuesday, two days after the blaze that killed nine people, including five children.

The drama at a building in southwestern Germany was captured in a series of photographs of the baby in free-fall as a group of anguished adults, thick smoke billowing around them, looked on.

Kenya: Peace Corps pulls out

NAIROBI — The Peace Corps said Tuesday it has suspended operations in Kenya after weeks of postelection violence, another blow to confidence as business leaders voiced concerns over the turmoil's effect on the economy.

Unrest has devastated the nation's once-impressive economy, decimating its vital tourism industry and prompting foreign companies to consider pulling out, business leaders said.

The Peace Corps said it was withdrawing its remaining 58 volunteers. After clashes first erupted, 86 volunteers were sent home in January.

Netherlands: Beatles' guru dies

THE HAGUE — Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died Tuesday at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop, a spokesman said. He was thought to be 91 years old.

Once dismissed as hippie mysticism, the Hindu practice of mind control that Maharishi taught, called transcendental meditation, gradually gained medical respectability.

He began teaching TM in 1955 and brought the technique to the United States in 1959. But the movement really took off after the Beatles visited his ashram in India in 1968.

Somalia: Grenade kills 15

MOGADISHU — A grenade tossed into a house killed at least 15 people and wounded 50 others Tuesday in Somalia's northeastern Puntland region, an official said.

Most of those killed or wounded were Ethiopians believed to be on their way to find work in the Arabian Peninsula, which lies across the Gulf of Aden, said Muse Geele Yusuf, a senior official in the region.

Yusuf said police were searching for the attackers and trying to determine why the Ethiopians were targeted.

Uzbekistan: Amnesties granted

Authorities in Uzbekistan have granted amnesties to two prominent rights activists in what could be part of government efforts to mend frosty ties with the West.

Saidjahon Zainabitdinov, who spent nearly three years in jail, said Tuesday by telephone from his home in the city of Andijan that he was released on Monday under an amnesty approved by the ex-Soviet republic's parliament in November.

The November amnesty, which was declared in connection with the 15th anniversary of the country's constitution, also applied to another prominent rights activist, Umida Niyazova, ending her seven-year suspended sentence for distributing anti-government publications and illegal border crossing.